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Kevin_K

NFHS changes 2019

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Of all of the opportunities the FED has, we get an "information available" secret sign mechanic. Fantastic! 

I do like the new pivot foot rule though common sense pays off. 

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Well it's not a secret anymore!  

 "it is imperative that umpires communicate easily and inconspicuously from players and fans. These mechanics say a lot without brining attention to the signaling umpire.”  No Spellchecker?

I can see it now, coach sees PU tapping his chest now KNOWS he has something different!  

Now I have to come up with another signal:mad:

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21 minutes ago, Tborze said:

Well it's not a secret anymore!  

 "it is imperative that umpires communicate easily and inconspicuously from players and fans. These mechanics say a lot without brining attention to the signaling umpire.”  No Spellchecker?

I can see it now, coach sees PU tapping his chest now KNOWS he has something different!  

Now I have to come up with another signal:mad:

Exactly!!! 

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Just because it's in the book, that doesn't require us to use it.

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I do NOT understand this "correct rotation" signal.  Two hands?  And it's given while the umpire is moving?  And it's not also for two person?

 

Can lawump elucidate us?

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6 minutes ago, noumpere said:

I do NOT understand this "correct rotation" signal.  Two hands?  And it's given while the umpire is moving?  And it's not also for two person?

 

Can lawump elucidate us?

As I recall, we just adopted what we umpires all call the rotation signal (plate umpire points to third, third base umpire points to first, first base umpire points home) for games with three-man and four-man crews.  It is nothing to worry about.  Ignore the label ("correct rotation") in the press release.  I'm pretty sure we called it the "rotation signal".  Even if I'm wrong about the label, it is nothing controversial nor nothing we don't already do.  We just codified what most top notch umpires do already.

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43 minutes ago, Tborze said:

Well it's not a secret anymore!  

 "it is imperative that umpires communicate easily and inconspicuously from players and fans. These mechanics say a lot without brining attention to the signaling umpire.”  No Spellchecker?

I can see it now, coach sees PU tapping his chest now KNOWS he has something different!  

Now I have to come up with another signal:mad:

Show me a coach (except those who also umpire) who reads the umpire signal section of the rule book, and I'll show you what it looks like when an Umpire-Empire member faints.  LOL

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1 hour ago, lawump said:

We just codified what most top notch umpires do already.

Wow, thanks! @jwclubbie and I appreciate it, considering we’re doing “the rotation” without having to signal it, when applicable.

The only “odd” signal we’re doing is the Push signal. 

Oh, and you better believe I’ll be tapping on my chest like crazy now when my partner calls a runner Out while the ball is rolling across the ground, or other similar plays “lacking important information”.

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5 hours ago, lawump said:

As I recall, we just adopted what we umpires all call the rotation signal (plate umpire points to third, third base umpire points to first, first base umpire points home) for games with three-man and four-man crews.  It is nothing to worry about.  Ignore the label ("correct rotation") in the press release.  I'm pretty sure we called it the "rotation signal".  Even if I'm wrong about the label, it is nothing controversial nor nothing we don't already do.  We just codified what most top notch umpires do already.

I understand why "ball" "strike" "safe" "out" are in the rule book -- these are communications with players and coaches (and fans).

But "rotate" and "I have information" and "you kicked the s*** out of that call" and "milf about 1/2 way up the bleachers on the first base side" are communication only between umpires.  These belong ion the mechanics book and not in the rule book, imo.

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Was really hoping to see some change to the hybrid rule. Oh well. At least we got rid of a silly pitching rule that wasn't enforced anyway.

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That "inconspicuous" tab on your chest will soon turn into a signal to a coach that you think your partner kicked a call. I don't plan to use this and I hope none of my partners do either. 

We, as a chapter, are pretty good about going to our partner when appropriate. No "secret" signal required.

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On 7/6/2018 at 6:23 PM, MadMax said:

Wow, thanks! @jwclubbie and I appreciate it, considering we’re doing “the rotation” without having to signal it, when applicable.

The only “odd” signal we’re doing is the Push signal. 

Oh, and you better believe I’ll be tapping on my chest like crazy now when my partner calls a runner Out while the ball is rolling across the ground, or other similar plays “lacking important information”.

I have been using this one this summer.

signal.gif

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On July 6, 2018 at 10:37 PM, Richvee said:

Was really hoping to see some change to the hybrid rule. Oh well. At least we got rid of a silly pitching rule that wasn't enforced anyway.

Coming soon!  I hope!  @lawump

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7 hours ago, Tborze said:

Coming soon!  I hope!  @lawump

Don't hold your breath.

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On ‎7‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 3:46 PM, lawump said:

Show me a coach (except those who also umpire) who reads the umpire signal section of the rule book, and I'll show you what it looks like when an Umpire-Empire member faints.  LOL

**Raises hand** But I umpired before I coached and now am solely focused on umpiring

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12 hours ago, conbo61 said:

I have been using this one this summer.

signal.gif

Normally I wouldn't go for help on a call to a partner who wasn't properly attired. But I'd make an exception for you. 

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On 7/7/2018 at 1:23 AM, MadMax said:

Wow, thanks! @jwclubbie and I appreciate it, considering we’re doing “the rotation” without having to signal it, when applicable.

The only “odd” signal we’re doing is the Push signal. 

Oh, and you better believe I’ll be tapping on my chest like crazy now when my partner calls a runner Out while the ball is rolling across the ground, or other similar plays “lacking important information”.

What is the "push" signal?  I use the "point to the base where I'm going" signal to indicate a possible rotation in 2 or 3 man mechanics already, so there is nothing new, except for the pitching rule change. 

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3 hours ago, ilyazhito said:

What is the "push" signal? 

Not relevant in 2-man. Used in 3 man. And it’s not a rotation, per se, as it doesn’t involve the PU. As said it’s called a “Push” or “Slide” (the problem with bellowing “Slide!” is it can be confused with coaches yelling at their baserunners to slide). The IP is U1 in A and U3 in C, so there is typically R1 and R2, or bases loaded. This can also be triggered by R1 only with 2 Outs (putting U3 in B-Deep) and R1 going on the pitch. With a liner to the outfield, PU may elect to stay home, and U1 will see this, and direct U3 to take R1 to 3B. In all cases, the Push is directed by the U1, triggered by the BR rounding 1B and committing to 2B. U1 cuts in from A, thus pushing U3 to 3B while U1 takes BR to 2B.

The best way to describe the actual signal is the “Hang Loose” hand gesture, but wagged back and forth between U1 and U3.

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8 hours ago, MadMax said:

Not relevant in 2-man. Used in 3 man. And it’s not a rotation, per se, as it doesn’t involve the PU. As said it’s called a “Push” or “Slide” (the problem with bellowing “Slide!” is it can be confused with coaches yelling at their baserunners to slide). The IP is U1 in A and U3 in C, so there is typically R1 and R2, or bases loaded. This can also be triggered by R1 only with 2 Outs (putting U3 in B-Deep) and R1 going on the pitch. With a liner to the outfield, PU may elect to stay home, and U1 will see this, and direct U3 to take R1 to 3B. In all cases, the Push is directed by the U1, triggered by the BR rounding 1B and committing to 2B. U1 cuts in from A, thus pushing U3 to 3B while U1 takes BR to 2B.

The best way to describe the actual signal is the “Hang Loose” hand gesture, but wagged back and forth between U1 and U3.

Isn't this just a reverse rotation?

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12 minutes ago, GPblue said:

Isn't this just a reverse rotation?

Yes -- and different groups use different signals -- the hand behind the back (I'll be coming behind you) or an open palm down by the hip with a slight wave in the direction of movement, etc.

 

No need to over-regulate this and require a specific mechanic.

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I understand, but I have never heard the "push" term before. I've heard (and used) the terms slide or reverse rotation, as well as executed it myself as U1 in a playoff game. I'll be going to Rochester for a 3-man camp next week, so I'll be getting a lot of practice with that, and the other fine points of 3-man mechanics. 

Besides the pitching rule, NFHS just approved post factum of standard umpire practices by adding them to the rulebook. 

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39 minutes ago, ilyazhito said:

I understand, but I have never heard the "push" term before.

It's common enough, and refers to the fact that U1 initiates the rotation (and usually is responsible for verbalizing that he's coming in, so that we don't end up with an even number of umpires at 2B).

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2 hours ago, ilyazhito said:

I understand, but I have never heard the "push" term before. I've heard (and used) the terms slide or reverse rotation, as well as executed it myself as U1 in a playoff game. I'll be going to Rochester for a 3-man camp next week, so I'll be getting a lot of practice with that, and the other fine points of 3-man mechanics. 

Besides the pitching rule, NFHS just approved post factum of standard umpire practices by adding them to the rulebook. 

There will be some new casebook plays to clarify certain rules/situations that needed clarification, but not necessarily a rule change.  I am very big into using casebook plays to provide clarity to our states and umpires when an ambiguity exists, but a rule change is not needed.  

The NFHS Umpire's Manual also received its bi-annual update.  These were not set forth in the press release.

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