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DontSuck1977

Double Tag - Mechanics and Communication

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2 Man HS Mechanics: I'm a bit confused on when to use it

In trying to understand double tag responsibilities better and proper signals/communication. I recently read that double tag signal should only be used when there's a man on 1st and 2nd and that you should inform your partner that you have the play at third if he tags. If he tags, tell your partner "I've got 3rd if he tags,  I've got 3rd if he tags, should a play develop at the play make it back to home plate for play at the plate and let your partner know, I've got the plate. 

My question: That just seems odd to me - with a man in scoring position shouldn't you stay home. Get to the point of the plate and to grab the tag on the lead runner and move to 3BXL for the touch at 3rd.

If someone could clarify for me and let me know when to use double tag signal that would be great.

Thank you,

 

 

 

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This is the plate umpire:

Always signal your partner before the first pitch to the batter in a situation such as this. 

If there is a clean hit to the outfield R2 is going to be running so stay home.

If there is a fly ball hit to the outfield that has no fair/foul or catch/no catch responsibilities for you, then get half way down the third base line to take a possible play at third.  If R2 tags and comes to third, tell your partner, "I've got 3rd if he comes" and get into the cutout at 3rd base for a possible play.  A way to key for this is if you have both the ball and runner coming. If there is a situation where the ball gets past the 3rd baseman then stay in fair territory and head home for a play.  Let the runners actions dictate if you go or not.  Staying in fair territory in this situation keeps you from getting in between the throw and the play at the plate.

If you have just the runner coming stay at the half way point.  Keep aware of the situation as defecation occurs and a play could possibility develop.  

If you have only the ball coming then stay at the half way point. Be ready to get to 3rd base for a possible play if it should happen. Also be ready to get back home quickly if the ball gets away from the player covering 3rd.

Be very vocal so your partner knows where you are. Nothing worse than an even number of umpires at a base.  And keep your head on a swivel.

 

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The situation is: R1, R2 and less than 2 Outs.

The IP is: PU at Plate (obviously), BU at C.

The signal: A 2-part signal... the first is for Infield Fly, the second is an over-under tapping of two fists, followed by a pointing of which Runner you’re taking. PU is taking R2 to 3B and BU is taking R1 to 2B.

The play (this is the part you’re missing, @DontSuck1977): A catchable fly ball to the outfield, wherein the Runners will be tagging and potentially attempting to advance. PU has to read it, and should head towards 3B if it looks catchable, communicating to BU as he goes. Of course, a fly ball to either foul line negates this rotation, because the PU has to take Fair/Foul and Catch/No-Catch (PU can potentially go up the 3BL and thus, take F/F, C/NC and R2 to 3B is possible, but the likelihood of R2 tagging and advancing is remote). In any case, on a caught fly ball, the Runners will likely not be advancing more than one base. Of course, the defense may lose control of the ball, and R2 may advance to Home, so a PU has to be aware and react rapidly to not leave the plate completely unattended.

Liner, uncaught fly ball, smash, etc... by all means, PU stays home. If/when 2 Outs, PU stays home.

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7 minutes ago, MadMax said:

The situation is: R1, R2 and less than 2 Outs.

The IP is: PU at Plate (obviously), BU at C.

The signal: A 2-part signal... the first is for Infield Fly, the second is an over-under tapping of two fists, followed by a pointing of which Runner you’re taking. PU is taking R2 to 3B and BU is taking R1 to 2B.

The play (this is the part you’re missing, @DontSuck1977): A catchable fly ball to the outfield, wherein the Runners will be tagging and potentially attempting to advance. PU has to read it, and should head towards 3B if it looks catchable, communicating to BU as he goes. Of course, a fly ball to either foul line negates this rotation, because the PU has to take Fair/Foul and Catch/No-Catch (PU can potentially go up the 3BL and thus, take F/F, C/NC and R2 to 3B is possible, but the likelihood of R2 tagging and advancing is remote). In any case, on a caught fly ball, the Runners will likely not be advancing more than one base. Of course, the defense may lose control of the ball, and R2 may advance to Home, so a PU has to be aware and react rapidly to not leave the plate completely unattended.

Liner, uncaught fly ball, smash, etc... by all means, PU stays home. If/when 2 Outs, PU stays home.

Thanks Max, 

This totally helps - I'll work this into my mechanics. It's going to take a few games to make this fluid. But your explanation was clear and straight on. BTW - I meant you at Cooperstown Dreams Park a few years ago. You heading up this year?

 

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36 minutes ago, umpstu said:

This is the plate umpire:

Always signal your partner before the first pitch to the batter in a situation such as this. 

If there is a clean hit to the outfield R2 is going to be running so stay home.

If there is a fly ball hit to the outfield that has no fair/foul or catch/no catch responsibilities for you, then get half way down the third base line to take a possible play at third.  If R2 tags and comes to third, tell your partner, "I've got 3rd if he comes" and get into the cutout at 3rd base for a possible play.  A way to key for this is if you have both the ball and runner coming. If there is a situation where the ball gets past the 3rd baseman then stay in fair territory and head home for a play.  Let the runners actions dictate if you go or not.  Staying in fair territory in this situation keeps you from getting in between the throw and the play at the plate.

If you have just the runner coming stay at the half way point.  Keep aware of the situation as defecation occurs and a play could possibility develop.  

If you have only the ball coming then stay at the half way point. Be ready to get to 3rd base for a possible play if it should happen. Also be ready to get back home quickly if the ball gets away from the player covering 3rd.

Be very vocal so your partner knows where you are. Nothing worse than an even number of umpires at a base.  And keep your head on a swivel.

Thank you umpstu - between you and Max, I've got it and will implement straight away. 

 

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1 hour ago, DontSuck1977 said:

Thanks Max, 

This totally helps - I'll work this into my mechanics. It's going to take a few games to make this fluid. But your explanation was clear and straight on. BTW - I meant you at Cooperstown Dreams Park a few years ago. You heading up this year?

 

One other thing. If you are the plate umpire and have a fair/foul or catch/no catch on the first base line and have to go up the line, communicate to your partner that you are on the line and he will then be responsible for all plays except home plate.

 

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2 hours ago, MadMax said:

The signal: A 2-part signal... the first is for Infield Fly, the second is an over-under tapping of two fists, followed by a pointing of which Runner you’re taking. PU is taking R2 to 3B and BU is taking R1 to 2

 

You can (and should) do this with one signal.  For one, you don't need to signal IFF separately because the "double tag" ALWAYS happens in an IFF situation -- the signal subsumes the IFF signal.

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On 6/21/2018 at 6:36 PM, noumpere said:

You can (and should) do this with one signal.  For one, you don't need to signal IFF separately because the "double tag" ALWAYS happens in an IFF situation -- the signal subsumes the IFF signal.

@noumpere I agree and like the application of the one signal approach.  Especially when on the plate and working to keep the game moving. 

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