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Guest Dennis

Ball and strikes

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Never say high or low.

It use to be to never say in or out -- sometimes you could indicate it with a brief head motion.

Now, it's more acceptable -- and some use it more than others.

As always, check your local listings for what is "right" in your area.

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From the bench - where you get most of your complaints - high and low are easy to see.   It's not easy to see in our out...especially out.  As a coach, I liked hearing "no, outside".   If you think it will go towards game management, do it and continue it.  If all it does is gives a coach something to argue about, stop.

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I guess I understand why you can't see in and out from the bench by following the ball, depth perception being less easy to decipher than seeing where the ball crossed the batter in the foreground or background - when I'm most likely to get upset is when my catchers glove is in the strike zone and doesn't move.

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21 minutes ago, isired said:

I guess I understand why you can't see in and out from the bench by following the ball, depth perception being less easy to decipher than seeing where the ball crossed the batter in the foreground or background - when I'm most likely to get upset is when my catchers glove is in the strike zone and doesn't move.

To the same point. You cannot tell from the bench if your catcher's mitt is set up on the plate or 6 inches off the edge. Sticking the pitch on the other batters box line isn't a strike. Pet peeve if many umpires.....setting up off the corner, sticking it and holding the glove there off the plate.  

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To the same point. You cannot tell from the bench if your catcher's mitt is set up on the plate or 6 inches off the edge. Sticking the pitch on the other batters box line isn't a strike. Pet peeve if many umpires.....setting up off the corner, sticking it and holding the glove there off the plate.  
Well yeah but I'm talking about from a coach's perspective, you know where the catcher is supposed to set up for each pitch. If he's that far off, you've got bigger problems than the umpires strike zone - not talking about 12 year olds, but with older kids, they set up right in practice they tend to set up right in games. And if they dont, they dont catch. It's a much bigger part of the game than throwing down to second.

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1 hour ago, isired said:
2 hours ago, Richvee said:
To the same point. You cannot tell from the bench if your catcher's mitt is set up on the plate or 6 inches off the edge. Sticking the pitch on the other batters box line isn't a strike. Pet peeve if many umpires.....setting up off the corner, sticking it and holding the glove there off the plate.  

Well yeah but I'm talking about from a coach's perspective, you know where the catcher is supposed to set up for each pitch.

Problem #1. You don't know where he's setting up. You assume he's dead center. If I had a dime for every varsity F2 that set up 6" off the plate on 2 K pitches......well, you get the point.

If he's that far off, you've got bigger problems than the umpires strike zone - not talking about 12 year olds,

I'm not talking about 12u. And nobody's calling the mitt in a 12u game.

but with older kids, they set up right in practice they tend to set up right in games.

if you mean set up over the plate, I disagree 100%. The older guys are the one's setting up off the corners to try to widen the zone.

And if they dont, they dont catch. It's a much bigger part of the game than throwing down to second.

 

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3 minutes ago, isired said:
12 minutes ago, Richvee said:
 

That's my point, if the catcher's setting up on the corner and his gloves not moving than most of those should be strikes, no?

On the corners..Fine..Nice job. But I've seen plenty guys try to stretch it  off the edge then stick it there. That's when I'll use a verbal "No! Outside" call. When F2 moves outside like that, I'll also stay in the slot and outstretch my arm towards the catcher's back to try to give the bench a perspective of just where their F2 is setting up.

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On the corners..Fine..Nice job. But I've seen plenty guys try to stretch it  off the edge then stick it there. That's when I'll use a verbal "No! Outside" call. When F2 moves outside like that, I'll also stay in the slot and outstretch my arm towards the catcher's back to try to give the bench a perspective of just where their F2 is setting up.
That sounds above and beyond, good for you (and the coaches!). Dont want to beat a dead horse, was just saying sometimes you know you've got a good catcher, you know he knows where to put his glove and your pitcher is hitting the spots and not getting the calls and you just know you're in for a long day when the umpire tells you "you can't see inside/outside." If I'm coaching, that's probably the only time you'll see me sitting on the bench in a live game.

But I get what you're saying, a good number of catchers think that 'framing' a pitch that is 2 feet outside is a good thing.

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