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Nic

Balls/Strikes: How much do you tolerate

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I'm blown away by the amount  of  complaining on ball and strike calls --- by coaches at all levels. I thought this was the one no-no in baseball, but every coach partakes with varying degree.

Seasoned vets, what will you listen to, for how long, and then how do each of you handle a whiny coach complaining about the zone going forward? 

I'm sure I'm tolerating too much. But before I go and get wild, help me out.

If a coach asks "where was that pitch?" Do you answer?

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On 5/16/2018 at 10:42 PM, Richvee said:

Something else to consider.....Some will argue that this is a no no, but I've had success with it...

Give location on (in and out only) on close balls. ..."BALL, that's outside", etc. Not every pitch, but on ones that just miss. Sometimes this answers their questions before they ask and keeps 'em quiet.

I've had GREAT success with this as well @Richvee, and I've also been criticized by some old timers because of it. 

I learned it by watching TONS of D1 guys. And as you said, it's to be used sparingly. When the catcher sticks a pitch indicating he thinks it's a strike, I firmly 'map' the pitch to explain with one word (no hand signals!!!) why it's NOT a strike. I.E... "Ball, outside". I do it loud enough for the appropriate people to hear it. Now no-one needs to say anything, and they know if they DO say something, it'll likely be taken as arguing balls and strikes. 

As you also said, good mechanics, appearance, confidence (which is reflected in verbal/physical mechanics) is the key to making this work. But I believe it eliminates most of the non-sense that many other guys hear, at least for me. 

I think the criticism is born in the idea that if you're not consistent it can get you in a lot of trouble, which could be true, so the answer is... GOOD TIMING & MECHANICS = CONSISTENCY!!!

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2 hours ago, Rich Ives said:

High/Low is really easy to see from the dugout.  Take that into consideration if you're getting it from both sides.  :)

I suspect @Rich Ives said this tongue-in-cheek, but high/low is also pretty easy to see from the bases.  If you really are hearing it from both sides, sometimes your partner can help put into perspective on whether you're leaking below the knee or above the sternum, or whether the buckets just need to be re-calibrated.

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7 minutes ago, CJK said:

I suspect @Rich Ives said this tongue-in-cheek, but high/low is also pretty easy to see from the bases.  If you really are hearing it from both sides, sometimes your partner can help put into perspective on whether you're leaking below the knee or above the sternum, or whether the buckets just need to be re-calibrated.

Sometimes you don't have a partner.  If both teams are telling you that you're calling strikes at the eyeballs (a scenario I once literally experienced), or ankles,  I hope Blue is open enough to at least listen and think maybe there's something to this complaining.  In this scenario, Blue was convinced these were strikes...so, the rest of the game, both pitchers threw to the chin and up and the batters got good practice at their tomahawk swings.

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8 hours ago, CJK said:

or whether the buckets just need to be re-calibrated

:rollinglaugh:

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On 5/16/2018 at 9:07 PM, Nic said:

How do you effectively "shut it down"? Exact verbiage that should be used? 

1. Ignore the first bit of chirping... give him the benefit of the doubt... maybe he's done chirping.
2. Give them the stare (with mask on)...lets them know that you heard them...non-verbal warning. 
3. Take mask off and say, "Coach, that's enough!. If you continue to argue B/S, you will be ejected/restricted."
4. Eject/Restrict to the dugout (whichever you previously verbally promised). If restricted, say, "And If you continue to argue B/S, you will be ejected".
5. Eject.

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I hope this does not come out wrong but if you have a good zone you will not get it as much as you do when your zone is bad. When I first started I got it a lot and now it is rare to hear anything. They will start complaining around the second inning for some reason. First remark I ignore, second remark gets them a stare down and third they get time out coach that’s enough and this is the official warning. After that see ya. Now if an assistant leaves his coaching box or dugout and says one word see ya. As for the where was that blue, I will explain a few times then after that I ignore. I am not going to justify every pitch you don’t like. 

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