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Guest Mr. Oizo

Obstruction Q

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Guest Mr. Oizo

If there's a runner leading off of first, and the first baseman catches a line drive hit straight to him, should obstruction be called if he blocks the runner's path to the base while attempting to tag it before the runner returns? Does it matter that he's in possession of the ball? If it can be called, do you award the runner second base?

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no, he's attempting to make a play on the runner while in possession of the ball.

 

yes, when in possession of the ball and making a play it matters. 

 

 

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On 10/19/2017 at 1:12 PM, Guest Mr. Oizo said:

Does it matter that he's in possession of the ball? 

It is very difficult (though not impossible) to obstruction when the fielder possess the ball. In the sitch that you  describe, no exception applies. No obstruction. Probably a DP. 

 

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Guest ftb2ss

If there is any possible way to call obstruction on the 1st baseman the runner would be awarded the base that the umpires judges the runner would have obtained if obstruction did not occur.  In this case the most the runner should be awarded is 1st base.

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8 minutes ago, Guest ftb2ss said:

If there is any possible way to call obstruction on the 1st baseman the runner would be awarded the base that the umpires judges the runner would have obtained if obstruction did not occur.  In this case the most the runner should be awarded is 1st base.

Under FED he would be awarded 2nd base on obstruction.

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20 minutes ago, UMP45 said:

Under FED he would be awarded 2nd base on obstruction.

under all rulesets he would be awarded 2nd. OBR and NCAA this would be type A/1 obstruction, which requires at least one base. 

is an example, although at 2nd base not first 

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1 hour ago, Gfoley4 said:

 

is an example, although at 2nd base not first 

I don't think this is good example obstruction in Fed/OBR (maybe NCAA, I dunno). In my opinion, the fielder is only blocking one corner of the base and giving the runner plenty of access to the base.

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That is one sharp umpire in the video. Here’s the rule that supports the obstruction call made in this NCAA game:

From the 2017-18 NCAA rule book (p. 33):  Rule 2-55-Note 4 On a pickoff play at any base, the defensive player must clearly have possession of the ball before blocking the base with any part of the defensive player’s body. The umpire will call “That’s obstruction” and then signal and call “Time.” The ball is dead immediately, and the runner being played on is awarded one base beyond the last base he had attained before the obstruction.

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2 hours ago, Gfoley4 said:

under all rulesets he would be awarded 2nd. OBR and NCAA this would be type A/1 obstruction, which requires at least one base. 

is an example, although at 2nd base not first 

This video may stand to confuse rather than clarify the OP.

Almost any infielder making a play on a batted ball will likely be protected in order to make the play on the ball, and will also have a very difficult time causing obstruction on any runner because he will already be in possession of the ball.

That scenario is not represented in this video.

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1 hour ago, Kevin_K said:

This video may stand to confuse rather than clarify the OP.

Almost any infielder making a play on a batted ball will likely be protected in order to make the play on the ball, and will also have a very difficult time causing obstruction on any runner because he will already be in possession of the ball.

That scenario is not represented in this video.

Read Sr Azul's post

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On 10/19/2017 at 10:34 PM, Rich Ives said:

Read Sr Azul's post

I did read @Senor Azul's post and his detailed answer certainly supports the call at 2B on this play.

The video does not, however, apply to the original post, which asks about a batted ball and a fielder in possession of said batted ball.

@Gfoley4's use of this video may (emphasis intended) confuse the issue raised in the OP as the fielder receiving a thrown ball is called for obstruction on R2 attempting to return to the bag.

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1 hour ago, Kevin_K said:

I did read @Senor Azul's post and his detailed answer certainly supports the call at 2B on this play.

The video does not, however, apply to the original post, which asks about a batted ball and a fielder in possession of said batted ball.

@Gfoley4's use of this video may (emphasis intended) confuse the issue raised in the OP as the fielder receiving a thrown ball is called for obstruction on R2 attempting to return to the bag.

You cannot obstruct if you have the ball, Doesn't matter if it was batted or thrown.

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It’s impossible to be in possession of a batted ball. Just sayin’.

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under all rulesets he would be awarded 2nd. OBR and NCAA this would be type A/1 obstruction, which requires at least one base. 
is an example, although at 2nd base not first 

Great video!!!

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On 10/21/2017 at 12:56 PM, maven said:

It’s impossible to be in possession of a batted ball. Just sayin’.

does that mean, once in the glove, it's now fielded and no longer batted?

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1 hour ago, stkjock said:

does that mean, once in the glove, it's now fielded and no longer batted?

The 3 statuses, 'batted', 'thrown', and 'pitched' apply only to a loose ball. A ball held in the glove does not have one of those statuses. This quibble doesn't affect the substance of the discussion of the video.

 

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2 hours ago, maven said:

The 3 statuses, 'batted', 'thrown', and 'pitched' apply only to a loose ball. A ball held in the glove does not have one of those statuses. This quibble doesn't affect the substance of the discussion of the video.

 

Thanks Maven

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This explanation found in the 2010 Jaksa/Roder rules interpretation manual (p. 26) might be helpful:

“Only batted or pitched balls that are airborne can be caught. By definition, batted and pitched balls that are not airborne—and any thrown ball—cannot be caught, but can be gloved. A ball is gloved when a fielder gains possession of the ball in his hand or glove, other than in a catch.”

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