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Pitch Clock — AAA Level

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I went to a AAA game (PCL) last night and, without looking anything up, I studied the pitch clock operator to try and figure out the "system" in place. 

1) Between most half innings, when the defensive team left the field, the clock was set at 2:25 and allowed to run. It seemed that the pitcher always made his first move before it elapsed. 

2) With or without runners on, the clock was set to :20 between each pitch and was started once the pitcher had the ball in the vicinity of the pitcher's plate (not necessarily engaged).

Once he started his motion (Windup) or came Set (Set), the clock went blank.

3) Twice, when the grounds crew came out to re-drag the infield (after innings 3 & 6), the clock started from 3:00.

4) With no runners on, the clock would start from :30 seconds after an out was made. This was very inconsistent. If the out was a strikeout, the :30 clock would start running as soon as the F2 started throwing it around the horn. 

If it was an infield groundout or outfield fly ball, the :30 clock most often started on the final toss back to the pitcher.

5) There was never a pitch clock on the pitch following a foul ball or a time out.  I don't know if that was by rule, or if it was because the PU never gave a visible signal to put the ball back in play.

6) Never once was the pitch clock "violated" according to my observations, although it was close on several occasions.

7) There were two clocks in unison — one behind the plate for the F1 and one in CF for the F2, PU and batter presumably.

What pro leagues are using the pitch clock this year as a study only?  Independent leagues?

What pro leagues (if any) are enforcing them with penalties assessed for violating them?  Only MLB affiliated Minor League teams?

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From the official minor league website, milb.com:

These procedures, created in partnership with Major League Baseball, will monitor the time taken between innings and pitches, and will limit the amount of time allowed during pitching changes. Umpires will continue to enforce rules prohibiting batters from leaving the batter's box between pitches.

Timers have been installed at all Triple-A including Coca-Cola Field, in plain view of umpires, players and fans to monitor the pace of play and determine when violations occur. The regulations and penalties for non-compliance are listed below.
 

Between Inning Breaks

-Inning breaks will be two minutes, 25 seconds in duration. The first batter of an inning is encouraged to be in the batter's box and alert to the pitcher with 20 seconds left on the inning break timer. The pitcher must begin his wind-up or begin the motion to come to the set position at any point within the last 20 seconds of the 2:25 break.

-Should the pitcher fail to begin his wind-up or begin the motion to come to the set position in the last 20 seconds of the inning break, the batter will begin the at-bat with a 1-0 count.

-Should the batter fail to be in the batter's box and alert to the pitcher with five or more seconds remaining on the inning break timer, the batter will begin the at-bat with a 0-1 count.

-Umpires will have the authority to grant extra time between innings should special circumstances arise.

-The inning break timer will begin with the final out of the previous half-inning. For inning breaks during which God Bless America or any patriotic song is played in which all action in the ballpark stops (similar to the national anthem), the timer will begin at the conclusion of the song.

 

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20/30-Second Pitch Timer

-Pitchers will be allowed 20 seconds to begin their wind-up or the motion to come to the set position.

-The pitcher does not necessarily have to release the ball within 20 seconds, but must begin his wind-up or begin the motion to come to the set position to comply with the 20-second rule.

-For the first pitch of an at-bat (after the first batter), a 30-second timer shall start immediately following the conclusion of the previous play. te.

-All timers will stop as soon as the pitcher begins his wind-up, or begins the motion to come to the set position.

-If the pitcher feints a pick off or steps off the rubber with runners on base, the timer shall reset and start again immediately.

-Umpires have the authority to stop the timer and order a reset.

-Following any event (e.g., pick-off play) that permits the batter to leave the batter's box, the timer shall start when the pitcher has possession of the ball in the dirt circle surrounding the pitcher's rubber, and the batter is in the dirt circle surrounding home plate.

-Following an umpire's call of "time" or if the ball becomes dead and the batter remains at-bat, the timer shall stop (blank screen) and start again after the following pitch.

-Should the pitcher fail to begin his wind-up or begin the motion to come to the set position in 20/30 seconds, a ball will be awarded to the count on the batter.

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2 hours ago, Senor Azul said:

Should the batter fail to be in the batter's box and alert to the pitcher with five or more seconds remaining on the inning break timer,

I'm assuming they mean the batter needs to be ready when there's 5 or less seconds left on the timer? 

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Mr. Richvee, I did not input any of the pace-of-play rules. I copied and pasted from an article found at the MILB website. I found another article dated March 24, 2015, making the announcement of the rules and the text was the same. So, if it is a typo it has been there from the beginning.

And thanks to Mr. Old Skool for adding a very important detail. The second article I found did mention that the pace-of-play rules were adopted for all Double-A and Triple-A baseball and were to begin on May 1, 2015.

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Thanks, guys. It was fun to try to figure it out on my own, but I didn't even think to look at the MiLB site. (DUH?)

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On 8/13/2017 at 1:57 PM, Richvee said:

I'm assuming they mean the batter needs to be ready when there's 5 or less seconds left on the timer? 

 

On 8/13/2017 at 1:57 PM, Richvee said:

Should the batter fail to be in the batter's box and alert to the pitcher with five or more seconds remaining on the inning break timer,

Fail to be in the box with five or more seconds on the clock, meaning he isn't in the box by the time the clock drops under :05. Right? 

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8 hours ago, Stk004 said:

 

Fail to be in the box with five or more seconds on the clock, meaning he isn't in the box by the time the clock drops under :05. Right? 

Yeah..Just worded strange.

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