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Umpires Manual Changes

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I know that many (probably most) of you do not use the 2-, 3- or 4- man umpire mechanics in the NFHS' Umpires Manual.  I'll be the first to admit that my association, under my leadership and suggestion 10 years ago, elected to use PBUC 2-man mechanics (we use CCA for 3 and 4-man mechanics).  Anyways, even if you or your association does not use the mechanics in the back of the manual, you should not dismiss the manual entirely.  In fact, the front of the manual (pages 1-35 of the 2017-18 manual) contains additional official NFHS rules interpretations and procedures which are not found in the rulebook or casebook.  Knowledge of much of these first pages can be invaluable to the NFHS umpire.  

Anyways, here are the changes (I have bolded the portion that has actually been changed):

(1)  First, in the back of the book, where the actual 2-man, 3-man and 4-man mechanics have been set forth, the umpires have been re-labeled.  The plate umpire is now "PU", the first base umpire is now "U1", the second base umpire is now "U2" and the third base umpire is now "U3".  (Previously, the plate umpire had been U1, first base was U2, second base was U3 and the third base umpire was U4.)  [My comment: though this is not 100% certain, I believe that this is the beginning of the committee's efforts to adopt nomenclature that matches all other rulebooks, casebooks, etc.  The problem is one of scope.  The amount of work needed to change, for example, all of the casebook plays in the NFHS database to use "R1", "R2" and "R3" as they are used on this site (and in NCAA/OBR publications) is momentous.  Despite this, I am hopeful that we can change our publications to match everyone else...not because I think the NFHS' nomenclature is wrong/worse, but because when you're the only entity to use a particular nomenclature system, it discourages people from reading your publications; and my goal, is to increase readership of our publications.  Again this is MY COMMENT, it is not an official position/decision of the committee.]

(2)  Section I, Paragraph 3 (added to the end of paragraph):  "When you agree to work a high school game, you agree to officiate the game pursuant to NFHS rules.  Thus, you are required to know these rules (and their interpretations) and how they differ from professional, collegiate and/or any other rules book.  Using professional, collegiate or any other rules book in a high school game is inappropriate and, in fact, constitutes unprofessional and unethical conduct by the umpire."

(3)  Section I, Paragraph 4 (added to middle of paragraph):  "Umpires officiating a game together should arrive early enough at the ballpark in order to conduct a pre-game conference to discuss and review proper mechanics (see Section IV)."

(4)  Section I, Paragraph 5 (added to end of paragraph):  "Umpires should ignore all but extreme profane, racist or derogatory comments.  In those situations, umpires shall not directly communicate with any belligerent fan.  Rather, the umpire(s) shall request the home team's management to properly handle the issue."

(5)  Section I, Paragraph 13  (added towards end):  "Additionally, there are some calls that cannot be changed.  These include calls on close force plays, tags on non-force situations where the ball is not dropped, a checked swing when a strike is first called..."

(6)  Section I, Paragraph 13 (added towards the end):  "As an umpire, you must take responsibility for making the call.  Sometimes, especially from "B" or "C" position it may be difficult, as an example, to see whether the first baseman pulled his foot or did not make a swipe tag.  First, you must make the call to the best of your ability.  If there is a question, you may consult with your partner.  If you go to your partner before you make a call and he can't help, you have essentially told everyone that neither one of you saw the play.

(7) Section II, Paragraph 11:  "Do not smoke or use smokeless tobacco or e-cigarettes on or in the vicinity of the playing field or anywhere else prohibited by state association rules, school district policy or regulations, or by law, nor drink any...

(8)  Section VI, Paragraph 21 (added at the end of the third sub-paragraph in Paragraph 21):  "If time is requested by the batter or catcher, the umpire may grant it and he may indicate which player made the request."

(9)  Section VI, Paragraph 25 (added in the middle):  "Reverse the above for a lefty.

Keep your eye on the catcher, not the foul ball, but be aware of where the ball is in case the ball contacts dead-ball territory.  As the catcher moves to find and catch the ball, move with him, but at a safe distance in case he changes direction.  As you move, keep your mask on until the catcher has discarded his mask.  Many umpires have inadvertently suffered broken noses, broken jaws and/or lost teeth as a result of being hit by the catcher's discarded mask.  A train catcher is taught to throw his mask a significant distance away from where he believes the ball will come down.  Furthermore, they are focused on the ball and not the umpire.  Thus, umpires should keep their mask on until the catcher has thrown his mask away.  If the catcher runs to the fence, dugout or elsewhere, follow him..."

(10) Section VI, Paragraph 40 (added at the very end):  "Umpires should refrain from meeting with their partners between innings.  If it is necessary to discuss a particular play, rotation or situation, that is acceptable; however, it should not happen frequently."

(11)  Section VI, Paragraph 46:  "Be alert to unsportsmanlike comments from the dugouts and take immediate action to halt them.  Frequent unsportsmanlike comments may cause you to lose control of the game.  If you have trouble determining who is making the comments, inform the coach that he is in charge of his team and he will be subject to the penalties of Rule 3-3-1."  (My comment:  This is specifically giving you the power to warn/restrict/eject the head coach when someone says an unsportsmanlike comment from the dugout, but you don't know the specific person who said it.)

(12)  Section VII, Paragraph 2 (added at the very end):  "At the time of the pitch in the two-man system, when in Position A, the base umpire should be walking into the pitch."

(13)  Section VII, Brand New Paragraph 3:  "Unless you are in Position A in the two-man system, use the hands-on-the-knees set."

(14)  Section XII, Brand New Paragraph 20:  "FORCE PLAY AT FIRST BASE WHERE BATTER-RUNNER MISSES BASE:  If a runner beats a throw at first base on a force play, but misses first base, the umpire shall signal "safe" and then call the runner "out" on appeal."

(15)  Section XII, Brand New Paragraph 23:  "REQUESTS BY COACH FOR UMPIRE TO GET HELP:  If a coach comes out and asks for an umpire to get help, and the umpire agrees to get help, the coach shall return to his position (dugout or coaching box).  After conferring, the umpires shall announce the decision to both head coaches.  If the call is confirmed, the coach shall not be allowed to return to the field to further discuss the call or he shall be subject to the penalties of Rule 3-3-1.  If the call is changed, the other coach shall be entitled to an explanation."

(16) Official NFHS Baseball Signals, Brand new Signal "F":  "DOUBLE TAG ROTATION: Bump both fists on top of each other with the index finger of the right hand extended."

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I know that many (probably most) of you do not use the 2-, 3- or 4- man umpire mechanics in the NFHS' Umpires Manual.  I'll be the first to admit that my association, under my leadership and suggestion 10 years ago, elected to use PBUC 2-man mechanics (we use CCA for 3 and 4-man mechanics).  Anyways, even if you or your association does not use the mechanics in the back of the manual, you should not dismiss the manual entirely.  In fact, the front of the manual (pages 1-35 of the 2017-18 manual) contains additional official NFHS rules interpretations and procedures which are not found in the rulebook or casebook.  Knowledge of much of these first pages can be invaluable to the NFHS umpire.  

Anyways, here are the changes (I have bolded the portion that has actually been changed):

(1)  First, in the back of the book, where the actual 2-man, 3-man and 4-man mechanics have been set forth, the umpires have been re-labeled.  The plate umpire is now "PU", the first base umpire is now "U1", the second base umpire is now "U2" and the third base umpire is now "U3".  (Previously, the plate umpire had been U1, first base was U2, second base was U3 and the third base umpire was U4.)  [My comment: though this is not 100% certain, I believe that this is the beginning of the committee's efforts to adopt nomenclature that matches all other rulebooks, casebooks, etc.  The problem is one of scope.  The amount of work needed to change, for example, all of the casebook plays in the NFHS database to use "R1", "R2" and "R3" as they are used on this site (and in NCAA/OBR publications) is momentous.  Despite this, I am hopeful that we can change our publications to match everyone else...not because I think the NFHS' nomenclature is wrong/worse, but because when you're the only entity to use a particular nomenclature system, it discourages people from reading your publications; and my goal, is to increase readership of our publications.  Again this is MY COMMENT, it is not an official position/decision of the committee.]

(2)  Section I, Paragraph 3 (added to the end of paragraph):  "When you agree to work a high school game, you agree to officiate the game pursuant to NFHS rules.  Thus, you are required to know these rules (and their interpretations) and how they differ from professional, collegiate and/or any other rules book.  Using professional, collegiate or any other rules book in a high school game is inappropriate and, in fact, constitutes unprofessional and unethical conduct by the umpire."

(3)  Section I, Paragraph 4 (added to middle of paragraph):  "Umpires officiating a game together should arrive early enough at the ballpark in order to conduct a pre-game conference to discuss and review proper mechanics (see Section IV)."

(4)  Section I, Paragraph 5 (added to end of paragraph):  "Umpires should ignore all but extreme profane, racist or derogatory comments.  In those situations, umpires shall not directly communicate with any belligerent fan.  Rather, the umpire(s) shall request the home team's management to properly handle the issue."

(5)  Section I, Paragraph 13  (added towards end):  "Additionally, there are some calls that cannot be changed.  These include calls on close force plays, tags on non-force situations where the ball is not dropped, a checked swing when a strike is first called..."

(6)  Section I, Paragraph 13 (added towards the end):  "As an umpire, you must take responsibility for making the call.  Sometimes, especially from "B" or "C" position it may be difficult, as an example, to see whether the first baseman pulled his foot or did not make a swipe tag.  First, you must make the call to the best of your ability.  If there is a question, you may consult with your partner.  If you go to your partner before you make a call and he can't help, you have essentially told everyone that neither one of you saw the play.

(7) Section II, Paragraph 11:  "Do not smoke or use smokeless tobacco or e-cigarettes on or in the vicinity of the playing field or anywhere else prohibited by state association rules, school district policy or regulations, or by law, nor drink any...

(8)  Section VI, Paragraph 21 (added at the end of the third sub-paragraph in Paragraph 21):  "If time is requested by the batter or catcher, the umpire may grant it and he may indicate which player made the request."

(9)  Section VI, Paragraph 25 (added in the middle):  "Reverse the above for a lefty.

Keep your eye on the catcher, not the foul ball, but be aware of where the ball is in case the ball contacts dead-ball territory.  As the catcher moves to find and catch the ball, move with him, but at a safe distance in case he changes direction.  As you move, keep your mask on until the catcher has discarded his mask.  Many umpires have inadvertently suffered broken noses, broken jaws and/or lost teeth as a result of being hit by the catcher's discarded mask.  A train catcher is taught to throw his mask a significant distance away from where he believes the ball will come down.  Furthermore, they are focused on the ball and not the umpire.  Thus, umpires should keep their mask on until the catcher has thrown his mask away.  If the catcher runs to the fence, dugout or elsewhere, follow him..."

(10) Section VI, Paragraph 40 (added at the very end):  "Umpires should refrain from meeting with their partners between innings.  If it is necessary to discuss a particular play, rotation or situation, that is acceptable; however, it should not happen frequently."

(11)  Section VI, Paragraph 46:  "Be alert to unsportsmanlike comments from the dugouts and take immediate action to halt them.  Frequent unsportsmanlike comments may cause you to lose control of the game.  If you have trouble determining who is making the comments, inform the coach that he is in charge of his team and he will be subject to the penalties of Rule 3-3-1."  (My comment:  This is specifically giving you the power to warn/restrict/eject the head coach when someone says an unsportsmanlike comment from the dugout, but you don't know the specific person who said it.)

(12)  Section VII, Paragraph 2 (added at the very end):  "At the time of the pitcher in the two-man system, when in Position A, the base umpire should be walking into the pitch."

(13)  Section VII, Brand New Paragraph 3:  "Unless you are in Position A in the two-man system, use the hands-on-the-knees set."

(14)  Section XII, Brand New Paragraph 20:  "FORCE PLAY AT FIRST BASE WHERE BATTER-RUNNER MISSES BASE:  If a runner beats a throw at first base on a force play, but misses first base, the umpire shall signal "safe" and then call the runner "out" on appeal."

(15)  Section XII, Brand New Paragraph 23:  "REQUESTS BY COACH FOR UMPIRE TO GET HELP:  If a coach comes out and asks for an umpire to get help, and the umpire agrees to get help, the coach shall return to his position (dugout or coaching box).  After conferring, the umpires shall announce the decision to both head coaches.  If the call is confirmed, the coach shall not be allowed to return to the field to further discuss the call or he shall be subject to the penalties of Rule 3-3-1.  If the call is changed, the other coach shall be entitled to an explanation."

(16) Official NFHS Baseball Signals, Brand new Signal "F":  "DOUBLE TAG ROTATION: Bump both fists on top of each other with the index finger of the right hand extended."

1, 6, and 9 really stand out to me! Great changes for the NFHS level

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Lots of good stuff here. For those of us in states that still use/mandate the use of FED 2-man mechanics, are there any changes in the mechanics sections?

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I have been lucky. Both Washington and Oregon use a "modified" CCA mechanic.

I love the change in 1. It is about time. Hopefully they eventually decide to change the runner designations soon as well.

6 I always thought was a given. But being on pages other than this one. I have found that to not be true.

9 I was always taught to have your mask in your hand and use it to knock the mask/helmet away if thrown in your direction. I think keeping your mask on could be distracting and cumbersome.

I'm a HUGE fan of 11

12 I don't like being mandated on how to stand in A. If in want to go hands on knees, I should be able to.

I like that NFHS has adopted the NCAA rule in 15. We have been doing this in Oregon by state mandate for about 4 years. And in Washington because for the most part no one has questioned it.

 

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14 hours ago, BT_Blue said:

 

 

6 I always thought was a given. But being on pages other than this one. I have found that to not be true.

 

 

At the Professional level PBUC does allow "do you have a tag" when the umpire in "A" gets crossed up on a swipe tag. Should be rare.

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This is a little confusing in the POEs:

"UMPIRE ASKING ASSISTANCE FROM HIS PARTNER

Often during contests, a coach will request that an umpire seek assistance from his partner for a particular call or play situation. Asking assistance from a partner is not mandatory. It is the discretion of the plate umpire if he feels that his view was obstructed or that his partner had a better angle on the play. If he does feel that his partner’s perspective will provide additional input to his final decision, then he has the flexibility to request his partner’s help. Once the opinion is shared, it is the plate umpire who will make the final determination on the call or play. This entire exchange will be quick and intentional using umpire signals that are relayed to players, coaches and spectators."

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30 minutes ago, Jimurray said:

This is a little confusing in the POEs:

"UMPIRE ASKING ASSISTANCE FROM HIS PARTNER

Often during contests, a coach will request that an umpire seek assistance from his partner for a particular call or play situation. Asking assistance from a partner is not mandatory. It is the discretion of the plate umpire if he feels that his view was obstructed or that his partner had a better angle on the play. If he does feel that his partner’s perspective will provide additional input to his final decision, then he has the flexibility to request his partner’s help. Once the opinion is shared, it is the plate umpire who will make the final determination on the call or play. This entire exchange will be quick and intentional using umpire signals that are relayed to players, coaches and spectators."

I was copied on an email earlier this month from NFHS that was sent to all state directors that clarified this POE. 

Either umpire may ask for assistance from their partner.  The umpire who has primary responsibility (not always the plate umpire) shall indicate the final determination.  The "plate umpire" does not always "make the final determination on the call or play".  It should read,  "the umpire who has primary responsibility for the particular call," will make the final determination on the call or play.

Again, this should be made clear in your state meetings...if your state director read the email sent from Elliot Hopkins at NFHS earlier this month.

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19 hours ago, lawump said:

[My comment: though this is not 100% certain, I believe that this is the beginning of the committee's efforts to adopt nomenclature that matches all other rulebooks, casebooks, etc.  The problem is one of scope.  The amount of work needed to change, for example, all of the casebook plays in the NFHS database to use "R1", "R2" and "R3" as they are used on this site (and in NCAA/OBR publications) is momentous.  Despite this, I am hopeful that we can change our publications to match everyone else...not because I think the NFHS' nomenclature is wrong/worse, but because when you're the only entity to use a particular nomenclature system, it discourages people from reading your publications; and my goal, is to increase readership of our publications.  Again this is MY COMMENT, it is not an official position/decision of the committee.]

 

I'll do it.  Pay me $20/hour and I'll have them completed for the next print run.

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Funny experience regarding #12. Our HS evauators have told me to stop walking into the pitch because, "you'll wear yourself out". I didn't feel like pointing out that pre-pitch prep for one HS game was not likely to wear me out compared to the 5 or 6 game days I have doing youth ball.

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For what its worth, I use hands-on-knees when in "A".  The only time I take a walking step is when I'm in "D" in a three, four or six man.  I guess I'm just stuck on doing it the umpire school way when I'm in "A".

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I'm more hands on thighs (fingertips pointed in) when in A.  It's more comfortable that HOK.

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On 11/14/2016 at 2:08 PM, grayhawk said:

I'm more hands on thighs (fingertips pointed in) when in A.  It's more comfortable that HOK.

I do the same. I find the standard HOK (fingers pointing out) grinds my pants into my knee and rubs me raw. The force being applied is more 'down' which causes my pants to run  which is my issue. Using the fingers in distributes the force better for me as it seems to direct the weight straight into the thigh/top of knee which does not make the pants move or cause irritation. I also find I get a better jump off the starting block from this stance.

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On 11/13/2016 at 9:18 PM, ALStripes17 said:

(2)  Section I, Paragraph 3 (added to the end of paragraph):  "When you agree to work a high school game, you agree to officiate the game pursuant to NFHS rules.  Thus, you are required to know these rules (and their interpretations) and how they differ from professional, collegiate and/or any other rules book.  Using professional, collegiate or any other rules book in a high school game is inappropriate and, in fact, constitutes unprofessional and unethical conduct by the umpire."

"Unprofessional & unethical" this seems a bit harsh, especially when we as individual umpires don't choose our mechanics. More likely than not if we are deviating from the NFHS mechanics (or any other code for that matter) it is because we have been directed to by whichever body is assigning us and not an individual decision.

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"Unprofessional & unethical" this seems a bit harsh, especially when we as individual umpires don't choose our mechanics. More likely than not if we are deviating from the NFHS mechanics (or any other code for that matter) it is because we have been directed to by whichever body is assigning us and not an individual decision.

I don't believe mechanics are addressed in that statement. Merely rules and interpretations as they pertain to HS games.

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4 hours ago, Umpire in Chief said:

"Unprofessional & unethical" this seems a bit harsh, especially when we as individual umpires don't choose our mechanics. More likely than not if we are deviating from the NFHS mechanics (or any other code for that matter) it is because we have been directed to by whichever body is assigning us and not an individual decision.

Does not apply to mechanics.  Applies to rules. 

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IMHO, unprofessional and unethical behavior is in the side of the NFHS is not remove the hockey style catchers helmet as the only option in the rule book. I wonder if NOCSAE is behind that.

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6 minutes ago, gnhbua93 said:

IMHO, unprofessional and unethical behavior is in the side of the NFHS is not remove the hockey style catchers helmet as the only option in the rule book. I wonder if NOCSAE is behind that.

Nope, that would be Insurance Underwriters and (Personal Injury) Lawyers driving that bus. NOCSAE is just a Certifying Body, akin to Underwriters Laboratories for electrical equipment and products. OSHA is the federal agency writing and enforcing the rules, and mandates that any electrical product sold by a US licensed company must be "Certified" and UL certification is one of the few accepted certifications.

Can I use non-certified LED lightbulbs, made for a buck or two, in my house? Certainly. Can I use non-certified LED lightbulbs, made for a buck or two, in my store or shop? Ahhh... now we're getting to the sticky part. You can, but if OSHA catches you, or if that bulb fails and contributes in any way to the injury of someone in your shop or store, a lawyer will have a field day in your pocketbook.

Two-piece (ie. Traditional Mask & Ear-flap-less Batting Helmet) catchers masks cannot prove that they protect against head injuries equally or better than HSMs. Because HSMs are a one-piece unit, you cannot (or, it would take purposeful and unusual effort to) wear it "wrong". Whereas, if wee little Jimmy doesn't put his TM on correctly, it may fall off mid-pitch and Jimmy may sustain a critical injury and/or die. If little Mikey swings and loses the grip of his bat on the backswing and the bat hits little Jimmy the catcher in the side of his head, will a two-piece mask set protect against that impact? If little Jimmy bails out on 58' pitch and turns his head, will that bouncing ball be deflected by the side of his HSM or hit him square in the temple and cause a TBI and/or death*? I am the biggest advocate for the Traditional Mask, because as a catcher, I had my own personally-purchased mask that I maintained and practiced relentlessly with. I was able to see more and be more effectively active with it (pop-ups, steals, plays at the plate, etc.). I also am adamant that a well-made (properly padded) TM is better against concussions than most HSMs. However, I'm going to lose that argument every time with the NFHS Board, because when it comes down to it, they are about preventing / mitigating all head injuries (of any kind), not solely concussions.

NOCSAE just gets a mask candidate sent to them, reviews it in their little makeshift "lab" there, and says, "Yeah, that works."

 

* - To be fair, a 58' pitch with a 13 yr old catcher who bails out is headed for your Nutty Buddy, but I digress.

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1 minute ago, gnhbua93 said:

Have you ask if NOCSAE receives a royalty fee for every helmet that is sold that bears the NOCSAE approval?

NOCSAE is non-profit, and comprised of a voting board of over a dozen associations, including the NCAA and NFHS as non-voting members. While I'm on the same page as you in terms of how stifling-to-innovation NOCSAE undoubtedly is, I don't think profiteering is at the core of it. Instead, it's a lawyer or a few who are inflexibly enforcing their agendas, if for their rhetoric alone, rather than allowing for science and technological progression. 

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On 11/14/2016 at 1:57 PM, grayhawk said:

I'll do it.  Pay me $20/hour and I'll have them completed for the next print run.

Count me in. This is a piece of word processing cake! Most of it would be a two-step Find-&-Replace process. Easy peasy.

Oh wait... I forgot... the NFHS codex is written by God's finger on stone tablets.

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I'm sure the standards by NOCSAE are nothing great because MLB hasn't made them mandatory at any level. College doesn't either. I'm also sure that to be certified costs a lot and there is a royalty plus other fees that are passed onto the customer.

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13 hours ago, gnhbua93 said:

I'm sure the standards by NOCSAE are nothing great because MLB hasn't made them mandatory at any level. College doesn't either. I'm also sure that to be certified costs a lot and there is a royalty plus other fees that are passed onto the customer.

Actually, if you were on the rules committee and listened to the two experts that the NFHS hired (in other words they don't work for the manufacturers), I think you'd come to a different conclusion.  (Both experts are PhDs at two major universities).  The NFHS is proud (and rightfully so) to have been at the forefront of player safety over the years...to the point where the other two organizations you have cited have reached out to the NFHS on certain safety issues over the years.  (It is not always the NFHS following the other two entities; sometimes they follow the NFHS...especially in this area.). But, what benefits and promotes children's safety doesn't always do the same for adults.

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Did you know that certain companies fund research for the findings benefit their products on the end?

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Have you checked NOCSAE's public Form 990 filing?

Most recent one posted right now is from 2014. Check out the financials and draw a conclusion with those facts rather than throwing up blanket statements that are read as complaining/whining and hold no water.

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8 hours ago, gnhbua93 said:

Did you know that certain companies fund research for the findings benefit their products on the end?

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Of course I do.  Some of them provide us with their studies.  I have to agree to a confidentiality agreeement, so I can't discuss them on this forum.  

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