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JoeC

Almost 2 for 1

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Runner on 1st, batter hits a ball up the middle. The field is 90' bases with an all dirt infield. The F6 make a good play to reach the ball. The throw pulls F3 foot off and I called the BR safe. F6 runs up to me and asked how the f**** could I call the runner safe. So naturally I give F6 the heave ho.,   Now the coach starts out but never made it. The plate ump knew if he made it out to me that he was going to go, so he told him that he might  want to stay in the dug out. Instead of acting like a jack, all he had to do was have me ask the HU if he had seen the pull foot the HU did see the foot off.

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Runner on 1st, batter hits a ball up the middle. The field is 90' bases with an all dirt infield. The F6 make a good play to reach the ball. The throw pulls F3 foot off and I called the BR safe. F6 runs up to me and asked how the f**** could I call the runner safe. So naturally I give F6 the heave ho.,   Now the coach starts out but never made it. The plate ump knew if he made it out to me that he was going to go, so he told him that he might  want to stay in the dug out. Instead of acting like a jack, all he had to do was have me ask the HU if he had seen the pull foot the HU did see the foot off.

If the coach came out to you why "would he go"? And why would you ask your partner if the coach asked you to get help? Were you unsure of your call? Your partner is 120 feet away.

 

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If F6 says it where everyone can hear it, understandable. If he says it between me and him, depending on the age, i'd be a little more flexible. Just because the coach comes out doesn't mean he deserves to be tossed immediately. He could just be coming to ask a question about the play, maybe ask for you to get help, or he wants to know what F6 said so he could discipline later. Yes, some coaches can be jack wagons but, not all coaches are. It is good to be firm with your call, but you must be approachable. If you already have it set in your mind that a coach can't ask, your not gonna last long.

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Runner on 1st, batter hits a ball up the middle. The field is 90' bases with an all dirt infield. The F6 make a good play to reach the ball. The throw pulls F3 foot off and I called the BR safe. F6 runs up to me and asked how the f**** could I call the runner safe. So naturally I give F6 the heave ho.,   Now the coach starts out but never made it. The plate ump knew if he made it out to me that he was going to go, so he told him that he might  want to stay in the dug out. Instead of acting like a jack, all he had to do was have me ask the HU if he had seen the pull foot the HU did see the foot off.

what age was this?

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Runner on 1st, batter hits a ball up the middle. The field is 90' bases with an all dirt infield. The F6 make a good play to reach the ball. The throw pulls F3 foot off and I called the BR safe. F6 runs up to me and asked how the f**** could I call the runner safe. So naturally I give F6 the heave ho.,   Now the coach starts out but never made it. The plate ump knew if he made it out to me that he was going to go, so he told him that he might  want to stay in the dug out. Instead of acting like a jack, all he had to do was have me ask the HU if he had seen the pull foot the HU did see the foot off.

You were in the B position, right? You got a good look at the pulled foot and called it. Did you signal that he was safe because he was off the bag? Doing so may have prevented F6 from going off, but regardless, he was out of line.

But why do you say all he had to do was have you ask the PU if he agreed with your call. What if the PU told you he didn't see a pulled foot?  If you weren't sure, ask before the call. Since you made the call, and based on your description, you had no doubt. If your partner said out and you day safe, whose call do you go with? Sounds like a better approach would be to tell the coach that it was your call, and he's safe.

Mike

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But why do you say all he had to do was have you ask the PU if he agreed with your call. What if the PU told you he didn't see a pulled foot?  If you weren't sure, ask before the call. Since you made the call, and based on your description, you had no doubt. If your partner said out and you day safe, whose call do you go with? Sounds like a better approach would be to tell the coach that it was your call, and he's safe.

Mike

Don't want to hijack, but you'd better pregame this. Not a fan of this mechanic. What if PU had a worse view than you?

My thoughts...Make the call. Make sure you emphasized the "off the base" mechanic after the safe call.

 

 "Now the coach starts out but never made it. The plate ump knew if he made it out to me that he was going to go, so he told him that he might  want to stay in the dug out."

 

As for the HC. You absolutely have to hear what he has to say. You just threw out his SS. He might just want to know what he said.

Good lesson I've leaned about game management is LISTEN. Never assume what a coach is going to ask. Let him ask a question, then answer it. Sometimes they'll surprise you with what they have to ask/say.

Edited by Richvee
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Of course the coach will come out. You just ejected his player.

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First, the original poster is in Northern Maine.  Its December.  Did this scenario really happen?  Didn't he mean to write, "after I ruled it a goal, the defensive team captain began to argue and I gave him a 10-minute game misconduct."  :D 

Seriously, HEAD coach/manager always has a right to come out to represent his team.  His coming out alone is not grounds for ejection.  As posted above, you just tossed his F6...of course, he is going to come out.

The last paragraph of @Richvee 's post is one of the best paragraphs about handling non-routine situations that has ever been posted on this site.  WE NEED TO LISTEN.  I'll give this example:  five years ago in a Legion playoff game, I tossed two players from the same team within 10-seconds of one another.  The head coach came out.  I expected him to argue, but I kept my mouth shut and let him start the talking.  He simply asked, "did you toss two of my guys?"  I said, "yes."  He said, "good they deserve it.  Toss 'em all if you have to."   He was totally serious.  He was not being sarcastic.  Then, he just walked away.  I wonder: would the same result have happened had I started talking to him as he was walking toward me?

Next, as asked above, what was the age of these players?  If they were young...then good ejection.  If they were shaving aged players, then you ejected too quickly.  At shaving age levels, swearing alone is not grounds for ejection.  Swearing while arguing a call is not grounds for ejection.  Arguing a call alone (even with a cuss word) is not grounds for ejection without a warning.  Swearing at the umpire (calling the umpire a name) or saying "you are a(n) _______" are grounds for immediate ejection.

Finally, the pulled foot is your call as the base umpire.  If you are not sure of what you saw, then you may have a mechanics issue.  The vast majority of amateur umpires (and first year pro umpires) stand too deep when standing in "B" (or "C").  The proper depth when standing in "B" (or "C") is NOT halfway between the back edge of the mound and second base.  The proper depth is halfway between the infield grass/dirt line located in the middle of the second base cutout and the back of the mound.  (There is a diagram of this in the first few pages of the new (2015) MiLB two-man mechanics manual).  If your initial position in "B" or "C" is too deep, you will never feel confident about your pulled foot/no pulled foot calls at first base because you'll never have the proper angle to see them.

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Runner on 1st, batter hits a ball up the middle. The field is 90' bases with an all dirt infield. The F6 make a good play to reach the ball. The throw pulls F3 foot off and I called the BR safe. Safe and an off the base/arm sweeping mechanic  F6 runs up to me and asked how the f**** could I call the runner safe. might have answered this question before being colorfully asked So naturally I give F6 the heave ho., If this was adult baseball, I might have just given him the f*****g answer, instead of an EJ.   Now the coach starts out but never made it. The plate ump knew if he made it out to me that he was going to go, so he told him that he might  want to stay in the dug out. Partners shouldn't be butting in. You EJ'd one of his players, the coach deserves an explanation Instead of acting like a jack, all he had to do was have me ask the HU if he had seen the pull foot the HU did see the foot off.

I know that your partner agreed with the pulled foot call, but what if your partner made a compelling argument that the ball was gloved before the foot was pulled. You could then reverse the call, but not the EJ. Then the fun really begins. 

An emphatic off-the-base verbal and non-verbal mechanic could have avoided the trouble.

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If this was FED, he could have rescinded the EJ.

Rescind an F-bomb dropping EJ ? in a Fed game ? get real. 
 

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Hey... I said could. Not should. 

As I tell coach when he asks what his misbehaving player should have done...
... he could have done an infinite number of legal things, but we're not going to start listing them all.

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Approachable was mentioned already.  These coaches are representing ALL of their players.  Sometimes, they too, have to just play a role.  I actually had a similar situation once.  Coach asked PU for time and he jogged out to me.  There was no ejection in this case, but it was a pulled foot call. Here is how the conversation went.

Me: How you doing Joel?

Coach: Hey Bill, I'm good thanks.  Now, I saw the pulled foot, but I have to make the guys think I'm out here, doing my job for them.

Me: So you're not going to go "Tommy Lasorda" today?

Coach: Naaa, I'm just going to point at the base a couple of times, we'll save Tommy for a night game.  Thanks.

Me: Thanks for not being Tommy.

 

Now none of the players, coaches or fans (or my partner) heard any of this.  After the game while changing at the illustrious parking lot locker room, My partner looks at me and says "I have to ask, Was that a "I'm just doing my job" conversation over there at 1B"?  I said, "sure was".  The ONLY thing my partner said was "thought so".

Not all coaches are RATS.  Some actually "get it".

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