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lawump

What to do?

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I umpired an American Legion regular season game last night with a partner with whom I had never worked.  I need advice on how to handle this situation:

My partner was a pleasant enough gentlemen.  There were absolutely no personality conflicts in the parking lot before or after the game.  In other words, he is an amiable enough fellow.

But, during the game he talked to EVERYONE.  He had running conversations with players, coaches, managers, etc.  Between most innings he would stand near behind the first base coaches box and check his email on his phone, or, alternatively, wait for F3 or the first base coach to arrive to start talking to them.  Sometimes, he would have a 30-second conversation (literally) with F9 as he was jogging out of the dugout toward right field.  (In other words, between innings he never stood in short right field between first and second base.)  

During pitching changes, he would stand with the infielders behind the mound and join in their conversation.  During those between inning breaks in which I stood on the first base line (during F1's warm-up tosses) he would come down and start talking to me (if he wasn't already talking to F9, F3 or the first base coach).  I despise this, so I just started standing on the third base line (which I also hate as I like to stand in front of the on-coming offensive team's dugout so I can turn to the first batter and say, "last pitch!" when appropriate.)

I could tell at one point that the VTHC was getting very annoyed.  I sensed that the VTHC didn't say anything to him out of paranoia that he would have calls go against him (which I don't think would have happened if he had said something.)  But, I could sense that the VTHC wanted to tell my partner to leave his players alone (especially his F1).

My question to you all is: how do you handle this?  I was embarrassed and felt like I was part of an amateur hour show.  This is certainly not acceptable, IMHO, on the American Legion level.  If this had been a game that my umpire association had assigned, I would have (as association President) pulled him aside and given him a stern talking.  However, this game was assigned by an association in another part of the state.  (I traveled to work this game.)  I did not "out-rank" my partner in this game as I have absolutely no status in this other association other than being "just a member."

Thoughts???  

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2 minutes ago, lawump said:

I was embarrassed and felt like I was part of an amateur hour show.

It seems to me that this is the crux of the issue for you: you don't mention any bad calls, mechanics breakdowns, rule mishaps, or anything pertaining to the game itself. Your concern about the coach might be legitimate, or it might be projection (sorry, but you seemed upset, and that colors our perceptions—ask any fan!).

You are an umpire with pro training and experience, as well as NCAA, and so you're used to being observed by knowledgeable supervisors. That has trained you to be keenly aware of optics: there is no "down-time" for higher-level umpires, no time when you can just chat and enjoy the day. I think your experiences lie behind your discomfort and embarrassment: had a supervisor been present, the crew would have been dinged.

But the context you describe is not one likely to have been supervised. And as you say, you bear no personal responsibility for your partner's lack of training, so even a supervisor's critique would have been focused more on him. This is by way of mitigating your embarrassment: it's not on you.

You've got two basic options: say something, or say nothing, and I think you could make a pretty good case for either one. If you wanted to say something, it could start with a question about the guy's ambitions for moving up. If he has any, that would open the door to a comment about expectations for between innings. If not, then it's hard to see what would motivate him to do things "your way," and you could let it go.

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I have a hard time believing, even if they don't know you well, that you are seen as "just a member". Assigners know who their quality umpires are, even the traveler umps.

We have lots of jabbermonkies, the only way to possibly have an effect is to talk to the assigner. When I worked in the Chiefs office, we got lots of reports on umpires, good bad and ugly from all different directions, but the most reliable was always the partners. Some, the chief would talk to the umpire, others, there was no correcting but it does effect what games they're allowed to get assigned. I would call or email the assigner, and treat it as you would an employee eval, two good, one bad, then suggestions on how to correct it. After that, it's in his court on how to handle it.



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17 minutes ago, maven said:

It seems to me that this is the crux of the issue for you: you don't mention any bad calls, mechanics breakdowns, rule mishaps, or anything pertaining to the game itself.

Excellent post.  I do think you have hit the nail on the head for me, when I was not able to do so for myself.  

He did have the issues that I quoted from your post above.  I left those out of my OP thinking that they were not germane (hell we all kick some calls), but in hindsight (after reading your post) maybe they were germane.  His complete lack of ability to pause-read-and react on fly balls hit to his potential area of coverage with no runners on base (I had exactly two fly balls down the right field line with no runners on base that I had to rule "fair", and I had to exactly take "three" runners into second base on what turned out to be three can-of-corn catches) combined with what I perceived to be two blown calls at first base (he had an argument from the VTHC), I think, made me more mad that he was continuing to talk and talk. I felt like I wanted to yell, "stop talking and get your sh!t together!!!"

In hindsight, he needs someone (a mentor?) to tell him that he needs some formal training.  He needs to attend one (or more!) solid weekend camps.

My debate now is whether or not to send an email to his assignor.  (I have a relationship with the assignor...while we're not "close" friends outside of baseball, we both work college together and get along well when we're together.)  I'm debating whether I should be the one to tell the assignor, or if the assignor should find out for himself when coaches call him to complain...and it is only a matter of time before that will happen.  One can only hide for so long on a field with shaving-aged players with lousy mechanics.

 

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7 minutes ago, Tksjewelry said:

I have a hard time believing, even if they don't know you well, that you are seen as "just a member". Assigners know who their quality umpires are, even the traveler umps.

We have lots of jabbermonkies, the only way to possibly have an effect is to talk to the assigner. When I worked in the Chiefs office, we got lots of reports on umpires, good bad and ugly from all different directions, but the most reliable was always the partners. Some, the chief would talk to the umpire, others, there was no correcting but it does effect what games they're allowed to get assigned. I would call or email the assigner, and treat it as you would an employee eval, two good, one bad, then suggestions on how to correct it. After that, it's in his court on how to handle it.



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Thanks!  I did not see your post before my last post above!  Thanks again for your advice.

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8 minutes ago, lawump said:

My debate now is whether or not to send an email to his assignor.  (I have a relationship with the assignor...while we're not "close" friends outside of baseball, we both work college together and get along well when we're together.)  I'm debating whether I should be the one to tell the assignor, or if the assignor should find out for himself when coaches call him to complain...and it is only a matter of time before that will happen.  One can only hide for so long on a field with shaving-aged players with lousy mechanics.

 

IMHO, if you want him to continue his current methods (which I think you would not - based on my take of the professional way you work/post)  then don't, if you want him to improve then speak to the assignor.  Frankly you will be able to intelligently inform the assignor of the guys short comings in a way that will be helpful, the coaches, I doubt it.

 

so my .02 as a learning layman - we all want the men in blue to be the best they can, while it maybe uncomfortable, set him on the right path

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Did you get the idea he was open to feedback? Did he ask if you had anything for him? Funny but you identified two problem areas for me. Judging trouble balls when I'm in A and wackers at 1b. I will make the distinction however between your partner and myself that I'm aware of the issues and would have taken advantage of the opportunity to ask you for suggestions. Often I think where you are might not be as important as the direction you are heading. Perhaps he is unconsciously incompetent. While it's not your responsibility to train him for a level he's already working, letting him know you are willing to help couldn't hurt. Thanks for bringing this to us. Some of us have been on both sides of this situation so hearing what others think really helps.

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1 hour ago, lawump said:

I umpired an American Legion regular season game last night with a partner with whom I had never worked.  I need advice on how to handle this situation:

My partner was a pleasant enough gentlemen.  There were absolutely no personality conflicts in the parking lot before or after the game.  In other words, he is an amiable enough fellow.

But, during the game he talked to EVERYONE.  He had running conversations with players, coaches, managers, etc.  Between most innings he would stand near behind the first base coaches box and check his email on his phone, or, alternatively, wait for F3 or the first base coach to arrive to start talking to them.  Sometimes, he would have a 30-second conversation (literally) with F9 as he was jogging out of the dugout toward right field.  (In other words, between innings he never stood in short right field between first and second base.)  

During pitching changes, he would stand with the infielders behind the mound and join in their conversation.  During those between inning breaks in which I stood on the first base line (during F1's warm-up tosses) he would come down and start talking to me (if he wasn't already talking to F9, F3 or the first base coach).  I despise this, so I just started standing on the third base line (which I also hate as I like to stand in front of the on-coming offensive team's dugout so I can turn to the first batter and say, "last pitch!" when appropriate.)

I could tell at one point that the VTHC was getting very annoyed.  I sensed that the VTHC didn't say anything to him out of paranoia that he would have calls go against him (which I don't think would have happened if he had said something.)  But, I could sense that the VTHC wanted to tell my partner to leave his players alone (especially his F1).

My question to you all is: how do you handle this?  I was embarrassed and felt like I was part of an amateur hour show.  This is certainly not acceptable, IMHO, on the American Legion level.  If this had been a game that my umpire association had assigned, I would have (as association President) pulled him aside and given him a stern talking.  However, this game was assigned by an association in another part of the state.  (I traveled to work this game.)  I did not "out-rank" my partner in this game as I have absolutely no status in this other association other than being "just a member."

Thoughts???  

Misery loves company, they say.   My rant in "One of those days" was more about the missed calls of my partner from hell, but I left out the part where he did the things exactly as you're describing here, including jacking his jaw with 1B coach while the ball is live and pitcher is ready to deliver.   There was rarely a time when he was actually in short right field between innings; he seemed obsessed with picking up the ball, rubbing it up, ambling around the infield.    I don't recall if he actually had his phone with him, I don't think so... if I had seen that.... well... oh my...

I got some pretty good advice in that thread about controlling what I can control, etc.   Looking back on it and considering the advice given, I was letting the "unconsciously incompetent" partner become a distraction for me and working the game.... "control what you can control".   

 

"I won't let all this commercialism ruin my Christmas."

- Charlie Brown

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7 minutes ago, KenBAZ said:

Did you get the idea he was open to feedback? Did he ask if you had anything for him? Funny but you identified two problem areas for me. Judging trouble balls when I'm in A and wackers at 1b. I will make the distinction however between your partner and myself that I'm aware of the issues and would have taken advantage of the opportunity to ask you for suggestions. Often I think where you are might not be as important as the direction you are heading. Perhaps he is unconsciously incompetent. While it's not your responsibility to train him for a level he's already working, letting him know you are willing to help couldn't hurt. Thanks for bringing this to us. Some of us have been on both sides of this situation so hearing what others think really helps.

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Good post.  All of us can improve!  I'll ask for constructive feedback when I work with guys whom I know have the ability to give constructive feedback (in other words, not the guy I worked with last night.  LOL.)  But, by way of example, if I work any game with a college-level umpire, I will ask them after the game for their feedback.  Watching myself on archived broadcasts is also a great learning tool.  (I know most umpires don't have professionally produced videos at their disposal; I'm fortunate in that aspect to have some games on TV.) Sometimes, what I see on video upsets me, but I do my best to correct it and not repeat it in the next game!

"Unconsciously incompetent" is absolutely, hands-down the best phrase to describe him.  He's a happy guy, with a smile on his face.  He's definitely not out there "just for the paycheck".

On one of the half innings when he came to talk to me, he said he had had "trouble on the fly ball to right field" (he wasn't sure what to do).  I used that as an opening to talk about pause-read-and-react and where to go based on what he read.  But that was all I discussed with him.

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27 minutes ago, lawump said:

Good post.  All of us can improve!  I'll ask for constructive feedback when I work with guys whom I know have the ability to give constructive feedback (in other words, not the guy I worked with last night.  LOL.)  But, by way of example, if I work any game with a college-level umpire, I will ask them after the game for their feedback.  Watching myself on archived broadcasts is also a great learning tool.  (I know most umpires don't have professionally produced videos at their disposal; I'm fortunate in that aspect to have some games on TV.) Sometimes, what I see on video upsets me, but I do my best to correct it and not repeat it in the next game!

"Unconsciously incompetent" is absolutely, hands-down the best phrase to describe him.  He's a happy guy, with a smile on his face.  He's definitely not out there "just for the paycheck".

On one of the half innings when he came to talk to me, he said he had had "trouble on the fly ball to right field" (he wasn't sure what to do).  I used that as an opening to talk about pause-read-and-react and where to go based on what he read.  But that was all I discussed with him.

The upside to my recent weekend was working with a young, professional college conference umpire on Saturday.   I think he was a bit cautious about providing advice, given our age differences, but as I broached questions during our two games, he opened up and was very helpful on some of the little things that help an umpire get better.   I literally LIVE for those opportunities.  Clinics can only offer so much, and can't possibly cover every little wacky game situation (and we had a few while we umpired two games where 48 +/- runs were scored).   He seemed to be very willing to offer hints and advice after hearing my questions.   One of my standard game routines is not to visit between innings.  Sure, there are times when there should be some quick visits, but his routine was that he was fine with it.   So it went, and each visit between innings was made worthwhile; there was no idle chit-chat about where to get a beer later or the weather, it was all situation and game related stuff.    

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1 hour ago, lawump said:

Excellent post.  I do think you have hit the nail on the head for me, when I was not able to do so for myself.  

He did have the issues that I quoted from your post above.  I left those out of my OP thinking that they were not germane (hell we all kick some calls), but in hindsight (after reading your post) maybe they were germane.  His complete lack of ability to pause-read-and react on fly balls hit to his potential area of coverage with no runners on base (I had exactly two fly balls down the right field line with no runners on base that I had to rule "fair", and I had to exactly take "three" runners into second base on what turned out to be three can-of-corn catches) combined with what I perceived to be two blown calls at first base (he had an argument from the VTHC), I think, made me more mad that he was continuing to talk and talk. I felt like I wanted to yell, "stop talking and get your sh!t together!!!"

In hindsight, he needs someone (a mentor?) to tell him that he needs some formal training.  He needs to attend one (or more!) solid weekend camps.

My debate now is whether or not to send an email to his assignor.  (I have a relationship with the assignor...while we're not "close" friends outside of baseball, we both work college together and get along well when we're together.)  I'm debating whether I should be the one to tell the assignor, or if the assignor should find out for himself when coaches call him to complain...and it is only a matter of time before that will happen.  One can only hide for so long on a field with shaving-aged players with lousy mechanics.

 

You mention you have a friendly relationship with the assignor.  Perhaps you can pose a general question about how umpires are trained in that part of the state, in particular do they receive training about how much interaction is TOO much.  You never want to be unapproachable, but there is a line.

Tie your question into how you guys are evaluated by your college assignors and then steer the conversation towards this particular umpire.  Present it as you are trying to keep the guy out of trouble and therefore it is less problematic for the assignor as well.

My $0.02.

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7 hours ago, Aging_Arbiter said:

if all else fails.......................block him.

Oh how I wish the assignors here let us do that.   Alas....  "baseball umpiring is like a box of chocolates.  You never know who you're gonna get."

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On 6/13/2017 at 11:58 AM, lawump said:

My debate now is whether or not to send an email to his assignor.  (I have a relationship with the assignor...while we're not "close" friends outside of baseball, we both work college together and get along well when we're together.)  I'm debating whether I should be the one to tell the assignor, or if the assignor should find out for himself when coaches call him to complain...and it is only a matter of time before that will happen.  One can only hide for so long on a field with shaving-aged players with lousy mechanics.

 

Well, let's say you and this assignor work together next spring, and he asks "What was your take on how Bob was?" If you reply truthfully, and there are several complaints in the interim (as you feel will inevitably happen,) do you think he's going to ask why you didn't mention it before he heard it from them?

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@lawump, I do not have the skill or experience you have, so please take the following with a grain of salt. If there is something that is helpful, I glad I could share some ideas. 

I think the hard thing is if we only work with someone may be once in a year. We only see a snap shot of that umpire's development. 

As others have noted, you do not know enough of that person to work together and get better by giving constructive feedback. Yet, there are some things to try.  I think the first thing is to model the professionalism yourself. Show your expectations. I will say to partners that I like to be alone between innings because it keeps me focused, or after the pre-game, I hope we don't talk again until after the game because it means we had a good game. Even, this is what we do between innings because that is what the association manual says. Model what you expect. 

Another option is to tell a story of how you got better. What helped you to elevate your game. May be talk about what you learned from an advanced clinic from a MLB umpire. Centre your small talk around umpiring. If that person is in a new level, it may be a chance for you in supporting their development. If not, at least you can informally negotiate your expectations through your stories. They may be defensive in the moment, but long-term they will incorporate the ideas if they are a team player. I think we have to be able to share ideas respectfully and constructively without it being taken personally. 

I may be lucky, but I work games with umpires from 17-71 and everyone is curious to learn, to better their best. We learn from each other. Everyone is different. I have cerebral approach and do not like small talk when I umpire. However, a part of me cringes when I hear the "partner from hell" stories, because of the passing of judgment that can de-humanize a partner. To other people, we could be the "partner from hell." People can have different styles, skills and temperament. But, what is important is that we do want to learn and grow collaboratively. I guess @lawump the only "partner from hell" is the one who does not want to learn. 

 

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Okay, so here's what I did:

I combined the advice of several posters.  I sent a text to the assignor.  I began with the positives:  that my partner was a "good guy", wanted to learn, seemed enthusiastic about umpiring, etc.  I then said that I think you (the assignor) need to have someone evaluate my partner as I had some areas of concerns.  I told him about his constant talking, checking his emails on his phone between innings and his significant struggles mechanically when a fly ball was hit with no runners on base.  I ended by saying that my partner has great enthusiasm and thus should be encouraged, but that he, in my opinion, needed a few weekend camps/clinics to get some formal training.  I also put in my text that I hoped that I was not over-stepping my bounds, but that I hoped that if he (the assignor) ever worked a game that my association  assigned and he had concerns about his partner that he would reach out to me.

The assignor thanked me, and told me they will definitely get someone to evaluate him, ASAP...Then, the next day, he sent out an email to all of his umpires about not using a cell phone on the field.  LOL

Thanks for the advice!

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5 hours ago, BCBrad said:

I guess @lawump the only "partner from hell" is the one who does not want to learn. 

That is very true.  My partner in the OP was not a "partner from hell".  Just a "difficult" partner to work with because of his mechanical shortcomings.

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16 hours ago, lawump said:

The assignor thanked me, and told me they will definitely get someone to evaluate him, ASAP...Then, the next day, he sent out an email to all of his umpires about not using a cell phone on the field.  LOL

Thanks for the advice!

Late to the game here lawump. Just remember my sign in is very true. Just like FG (FG was played by Tom Hanks) was openly honest in one of his comments to Jenny. It hurts. However, at least in my own mind, I/dd will admit to being 50/50 good with finding those greasy spoon places to find sustenance.

I have no idea how to handle the situation you were dealing with the absolute correct way. Say nothing and let it go on. Say something and try to say it constructively and concisely and hopefully positively, in words that the other party will know they are not being highly admonished or whatever the words are that make people go negative and want to jump off a bridge. What are the right words and what is the right thing to do. You lawyers are great wordsmiths in/with the English language or you are out of a job, and I use the word wordsmith in a non-negative way, but how do you really know I am being positive or am I trying to sneak in some sneakily worded cheap shot? Ya know, sometimes you just got to umpire.

But, here is my problem with the situation.

How does an umpire get this far with doing those "absolute no no's" on the field with decorum. The respect is earned not coddling or glad-handing, but in your on field umpiring and handling situations. Hustle, mechanics, confidant and concise calls, fair but firm approachable demeanor when needed exhibited by body language and voice.

Although we want this to be about the umpire we just worked with, let's get a little more 'up the chain of command" (IMHO we don't move up the COC ladder to ask questions many times). Exactly where, when, how, why, did this person actually think any of this was even remotely acceptable. I am more inclined to blame those in a position to have this well-intended individual, to work at all, knowing they think this on field demeanor is an acceptable way to umpire as part of the Association/Assignor they are representing. This should have been squelched at the very beginning levels of any Association that is contracted to work. The Assignor and Association has to go look in the mirror and take the hit/good look at themselves for this, unless this individual suddenly just went rogue this one time. It seems hard to believe this was his first time to the rodeo.

If, as an assignor or Association something totally out of my/our control happened and I could only embarrassingly send someone that I knew was out of their element and that we were working on, that had some bad habits, that they somehow see as acceptable (how in the heck did they acquire these after all our meetings/clinics in the room and on field demonstrations?), I (as assignor or Association) would be on that phone or on the premises myself to some how get a message to lawump and give a heads up on what had just transpired, even if I was an assignor from another group. (maybe a situation where 2 different groups assign 1 umpire each to a game.).

So, my beef is with the association/assignor more so than the umpire. Phone in the game????? Give me a break. Only an absolute emergency situation like relative on their death bed, would even make me carry a phone on the field. What did we do prior to Cell Phones. We probably cancelled the game with the assignor and sat by the land line phone in the house or worked the game and ran back home to monitor the phone. I would also let my partner know that I had an emergency situation but I would only go for the message in between innings if??????????? I needed to. At least you would be aware of this.

Remember, I believe I saw somewhere on the internet (maybe I dreamed it up) there was a guy, who in a pre-game with his crew-chief before a College game, openly admitted he was not as up to snuff "anymore" in the 2 man system as he would like to be. The umpire who admitted this, I believe, was negatively reported on by the CC, but I am not sure if with the negativity the CC asked not to work with him again since (at this moment I cannot find that old comment from an old article that I either dreamed or read the comment)  (crew chiefs probably have to report whatever they got positive or negative on their partners). I also believe this to be a decent umpire even if rusty. I believe this umpire had to retire due to a back injury.

Just some thoughts. How would each of us handle this situation. Let it go?, constructively inform?, who knows. Sometimes you just got to umpire, with either decision you make and let the chips fall where they may.

Notice I played the old run away and hide game without stating a definitive answer. the coach is on my butt on balls and strikes. I clearly saw the batter go on the check swing but since they are on my butt.              dd--- did he go????   law ump--Go where?????

 

dd

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I've worked with two umpires this year like what you describe, @lawump. They both had many more years of umpiring than I did, but it was at lower levels of ball and as was indicated by their performances, instead of having, say, five years of experience, they had one year of experience five times. They reached a level of rudimentary knowledge and skill early on and stayed there. So now I'm working games with them.

Partner 1 was doing the phone thing a lot. Between every inning, he'd walk over to me and tell me the score of the Spurs game with his face buried in his Android. Between innings, I said very quietly and non-demonstratively to him, "Please put your phone away. Our association has a strict rule against having them on the field and these teams are watching." I had to umpire the umpire and he responded favorably by never taking his phone out again and behaving with more contrition for the rest of the game.

Partner 2 wants to be everyone's pal. Shakes hands and fist bumps all the players. He even joined their post-game high-five line, much to my shock and horror. During one game, he made the correct out call when a runner walked off the base after thinking time had been granted, which it clearly wasn't. When the player voiced his surprise, my partner says loud enough for everyone to hear, "Hey, he can go back to second. I don't care." Luckily, nobody responded and we stuck to the correct call without incident. But I said to him between innings, "Your desire to be everyone's buddy may be limiting your ability to effectively umpire. These guys may be rec league, but you're a professional umpire who is paid to be the arbiter of the rules of this game. So make your call and stick to it. Rules are not to be negotiated. If there's any question, you and I will get together on it, but don't ever offer up an alternative on the field."

He felt bad about it, but that's his tough luck. Sometimes the learning curve is emotionally painful and you have to take your lumps. Sometimes, you have to be the guy to hand out the lumps. And sometimes guys just can't cut it when your expectations of them are higher than their own. Those guys will either get it or not. Many will quit and never umpire again. The baseball world will suffer no loss over that.

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@dumbdumb: I think in my situation here's what happened:  You had an assigning association (which is actually a very good association with good standards)  that assigns American Legion games on a much larger geographical scale than they do for high school games.  This explains the reason why this particular American Legion game had two umpires officiating who umpire high school games for associations other than the one that assigned this particular Legion game.  In short, the assigning association has to expand its roster for American Legion games for two reasons: (1) not all of its high school umpires are qualified to work Legion and (2) they have a much broader geographic area to cover with Legion.  

As a result, this association often assigns umpires to work American Legion games that they have not personally seen, but rather come recommended to them by these umpires' high school associations.  Additionally, the assigning association's "training" before the start of the Legion season is limited to some emails about association policies and the "major rule differences" between OBR and FED.  Frankly, I'm okay with this minimal amount of training for two reasons:  (1) there is hardly any time between the end of the high school playoffs and the start of American Legion, and (2) Legion umpires are supposed to be the "best of the best" of the high school umpires.

In this particular situation...from what I understand...my partner was recommended to the American Legion assigning association by his high school association.  His high school association, IMHO, does not have the best reputation as their training is lacking.  If the assigning association deserves any blame it is for assigning someone solely based on the recommendation of another association when that other association's reputation for training is less than stellar.  The real blame, IMHO, deserves to be placed on my partner's high school association.  In my state it is the high school associations who are supposed to do the comprehensive training and evaluation.  [Now, if the association that assigned him to this Legion games continues to use his services for Legion...then the blame can be spread more to them.]

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4 hours ago, lawump said:

@dumbdumb: the real blame, IMHO, deserves to be placed on my partner's high school association.  In my state it is the high school associations who are supposed to do the comprehensive training and evaluation. 

Thank you lawump. That was kind of how I saw it reading between the lines, even though I am blind in one eye and cannot see out the other.

Wasn't trying to get you in any trouble.

Hope you were not texting the above while driving to that Florence game to scout Caleb Stone and Zach Robbins.

Happy Trails to you.

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