Register or Sign In to remove these ads
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Mussgrass

New Glasses

12 posts in this topic

I need to buy new glasses. While I am at it, I am thinking of buying  a 2nd pair just for umpiring. I am asking for advice as to what I should buy. Frame material, lens configuration, anything else.

For the record, I have never worn contacts and don't have any interest in them (at this point).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Register or Sign In to remove these ads

Flexible Titanium frames with polycarb lenses for regular wear, and Wiley X frames with polarized polycarb lenses for sunglasses. Try all frames on while wearing mask.

:-)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought 2 pairs exactly the same except one pair was made into sunglasses. Works perfect for me, no adjusting, etc.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies, so far. I should have also mentioned what about the size of the lenses and any coatings or anything like that. I don't want to get a whole lot of money wrapped up into a second pair of glasses. I do like the sunglasses ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get the lense size that you would normally wear needing prescription glasses. "Scratch proof" coatings are always recommended.

:-)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, SJA said:

Get the lense size that you would normally wear needing prescription glasses. "Scratch proof" coatings are always recommended.

:-)

No lens is scratch proof. Virtually every lens now has a coating to prevent scratching  unless you go rock bottom with a basic, plastic lens. Scratch resistant is far more accurate.

Polycarbonate is a must for the field. They're not going to shatter if you get hit.

Sunglasses are a great 2nd pair option. Check out the Oakley styles and the Prizm "Field" color lens. I recommend them highly.

Spend the extra $$ and get the ant-reflective coating on you clear pair. It's also a great option on the back side of the sun lenses. The AR coating will reduce glare, and makes things much clearer especially under the lights in a night game. Those annoying reflections you get off lenses during games or from oncoming headlights is virtually eliminated. If your optical professional offers different grades of "AR" coating, don't get just "basic". Spend the $$ for "premium" AR..also know by trade names such as Crizal, Saphire,--two of the more popular premium AR coatings. Some "basic" AR lenses tend to attract dust, and are hard to clean as they leave streaks and smudges. The better coatings have a great hydrophobic outer coating that will repel water, stay clean, and provide better scratch resistance.

As far as frames..the choice is yours.There's a multitude of materials available now. Titanium is nice, light, and tend to be expensive. Some of the "rimless" frames will work well also.... The ones with a groove...I highly advise steering clear of the "drill Mount frames"...any frames where the lenses are held to the frames by screws or plastic pins. There stylish and great for a "dress" pair, but you don't want them on a ballfield or as your only pair. They are high maintenance as the pins or screws tend to loosen  and require trips to the optician for repairs. Nothing wrong with the plastic frames, or the multitude of other resins used to make lightweight "plastic" frames.

Lens size is personal. Get frames that fit your face. (Large (58,60mm eyesizes) are out of style and tough to fit under the mask. DO bring your mask to make sure they'llwork under it. I've never personally had any issues with any of my frames not fitting undermy mask, however YRMV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Richvee said:

No lens is scratch proof. Virtually every lens now has a coating to prevent scratching.

That's why I said "Scratch proof" in quotes. . . . and unless requested and $$ for, most lenses are not coated to prevent scratching. If this is currently the marketing realm, please let me know what company / brand does this. I would like to save a few 100' $ on my next ones.

Oh, and most "scratch" coatings are only warranted for one year after purchase . . .  been there for 13 years, done that.

THANKS! :-) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, SJA said:

That's why I said "Scratch proof" in quotes. . . . and unless requested and $$ for, most lenses are not coated to prevent scratching. If this is currently the marketing realm, please let me know what company / brand does this. I would like to save a few 100' $ on my next ones.

Oh, and most "scratch" coatings are only warranted for one year after purchase . . .  been there for 13 years, done that.

THANKS! :-) 

Not sure where your getting your info, or your glasses, but in my practice, and in most other opticals I know, we don't even offer a regular plastic lens without a scratch coating unless we're asked. That's bottom of the barrel basic plastic with no warranty whatsoever. And I'm not selling one unless my patient is 100% aware of what a bad lens choice that is. 

And that only applies to plastic, CR-39.

You cannot manufacture a polycarbonate lens without a scratch resistant coating on them. The material is to soft and would scratch by just wiping them with a cloth if it weren't coated. Whether your optical shop chooses to warranty it for a year without charging you or claiming they're adding a scratch resistant coat is their business....Also,  your higher end AR coated lenses are guaranteed for two years in most cases. Some retailers charge you to buy the scratch warranty. However, in the case of any Polycarbonate, and/or AR coated lens, the scratch coating is there, regardless of what they're telling or trying to sell you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info. I'll remember that when I talk to my optometrist and need new glasses.

:-)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, SJA said:

Thanks for the info. I'll remember that when I talk to my optometrist and need new glasses.

:-)

Keep in mind..The optician usually knows more about lenses, materials, etc, than the Dr... Of course,there are exceptions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My optometrist has an optician on the premises. My be that's why my glasses are so $$$

HA! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The quality stuff  is expensive. But for the most part, you get what you pay for. In a DR/optician setting, you're paying for the personal and professional attention and service. In the chains you paying full blown retail for one hour service, mall rents, and the ridiculous number of salaries to pay pencil pushing/number crunching middle management types. (Not to mention sales people have daily and weekly goals to meet or they get written up, so they'll sell you as much as they can. Doesn't matter if you need it or not). You certainly can find deals on line but I'm not familiar enough with them to judge quality, accuracy, etc.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0