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2015 NFHS Part 1 test

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What do you guys think about this one?

C is clearly (well, I hope so) the desired answer.  The resulting statement (of the question followed by C) is nearly a direct quote of the last sentence of 6-1-3.

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I agree w/ all of you.  I'm having a discussion w/ another umpire in our area who feels like they should get credit for B as well, but my contention is that C is the best answer b/c it's word-for-word in the rule book.  B is nowhere in the rule book and it is a rules test.  

 

B isn't...and in fact if you select B, you're saying that C isn't correct...on the notion that B says both feet, C says one foot.  (paraphrase)

 

Yes, B is true, but C is word-for-word in the rule book. 

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I agree w/ all of you.  I'm having a discussion w/ another umpire in our area who feels like they should get credit for B as well, but my contention is that C is the best answer b/c it's word-for-word in the rule book.  B is nowhere in the rule book and it is a rules test.  

 

B isn't...and in fact if you select B, you're saying that C isn't correct...on the notion that B says both feet, C says one foot.  (paraphrase)

 

Yes, B is true, but C is word-for-word in the rule book. 

 

B is not the best answer, because having both feet behind the rubber is not necessary. C states the necessary and sufficient conditions (criteria), which makes it the best answer.

 

It's not ideal test-making, but hell, it's FED.

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I agree w/ all of you.  I'm having a discussion w/ another umpire in our area who feels like they should get credit for B as well, but my contention is that C is the best answer b/c it's word-for-word in the rule book.  B is nowhere in the rule book and it is a rules test.  

 

B isn't...and in fact if you select B, you're saying that C isn't correct...on the notion that B says both feet, C says one foot.  (paraphrase)

 

Yes, B is true, but C is word-for-word in the rule book. 

 

B is not the best answer, because having both feet behind the rubber is not necessary. C states the necessary and sufficient conditions (criteria), which makes it the best answer.

 

It's not ideal test-making, but hell, it's FED.

 

 

Correct.  When you have to choose one or the other, you have to select C.  

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In the 2016 test I am having a bit of trouble with the pitching questions. I guess I am trying just too hard but they are all sounding alike to my by now. Could someone shed some light on them for me. Please!!

1) The pitcher places his pivot foot on the pitching plate with the toe of the pivot foot in front of a line through the front edge of the plate and the toe of his pivot foot behind the back edge. His non-pivot foot is on and partially behind a line extending through the front edge of the pitching plate.

Ilegal pitching position

legal wind up position

legal set position

2)The pitcher places is pivot foot on the pitching plate with the toe of the pivot foot in front of a line through the front edge of the plate and the toe of this pivot foot behind the back edge. His non-pivot foot is front of a line extending through the front edge of the pitching plate.

Illegal pitching position

legal wind up position

legal set position

3) The pitcher places his entire pivot foot in front of and parallel to the pitching plate. His entire non-pivot foot is in front of and parallel to the pitching plate. His entire non-pivot foot is in front of a line extending through the front edge of the pitching plate.

1) Illegal pitching position

2) legal winding position

3)legal set position 

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18 hours ago, ChrisWolf said:

In the 2016 test I am having a bit of trouble with the pitching questions. I guess I am trying just too hard but they are all sounding alike to my by now. Could someone shed some light on them for me. Please!!

1) The pitcher places his pivot foot on the pitching plate with the toe of the pivot foot in front of a line through the front edge of the plate and the toe heel of his pivot foot behind the back edge. His non-pivot foot is on and partially behind a line extending through the front edge of the pitching plate.

Ilegal pitching position

legal wind up position

legal set position

2)The pitcher places is pivot foot on the pitching plate with the toe of the pivot foot in front of a line through the front edge of the plate and the toe heel of this pivot foot behind the back edge. His non-pivot foot is front of a line extending through the front edge of the pitching plate.

Illegal pitching position

legal wind up position

legal set position

3) The pitcher places his entire pivot foot in front of and parallel to the pitching plate. His entire non-pivot foot is in front of and parallel to the pitching plate. His entire non-pivot foot is in front of a line extending through the front edge of the pitching plate.

1) Illegal pitching position

2) legal winding  wind up position

3)legal set position 

I think you have some typos (or the test does) but with the changes above it should be easy to tell whether the pitcher is in the windup, the set, or a hybrid of each.

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1 hour ago, BT_Blue said:

I think they have these typos EVERY DAMN YEAR. And no one ever decides to fix them.

There's your problem. That which is generated by a committee must be remedied by a committee.

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On 1/5/2017 at 4:10 PM, ChrisWolf said:

1) The pitcher places his pivot foot on the pitching plate with the toe of the pivot foot in front of a line through the front edge of the plate and the toe of his pivot foot behind the back edge. His non-pivot foot is on and partially behind a line extending through the front edge of the pitching plate.

I think this question might be worded correctly. In this one, which is supposed to be a windup-ish, the non-pivot is legal, but the pivot foot is completely behind the rubber. F1 has thus disengaged, and may not pitch from this position.

On 1/5/2017 at 4:10 PM, ChrisWolf said:

2)The pitcher places is pivot foot on the pitching plate with the toe of the pivot foot in front of a line through the front edge of the plate and the toe of this pivot foot behind the back edge. His non-pivot foot is front of a line extending through the front edge of the pitching plate.

This one has a typo, unless F1 has toes on both ends of his pivot foot. The pivot is supposed to be legal here — on the rubber, basically — and the non-pivot is illegally off and in front of the rubber. This is the hybrid position, almost depicted in this image (the image does not have the heel of the pivot foot off the back of the rubber).

slide_34.jpg

On 1/5/2017 at 4:10 PM, ChrisWolf said:

3) The pitcher places his entire pivot foot in front of and parallel to the pitching plate. His entire non-pivot foot is in front of and parallel to the pitching plate. His entire non-pivot foot is in front of a line extending through the front edge of the pitching plate.

No problem with this one. Here's an image that has some versions of this position.

slide_10.jpg

These are all legal except the last (bottom right). By rule, the pivot must be "in contact with or directly in front of and parallel to the pitcher's plate." The conjunctions are ambiguous: by interpretation, we want (in contact with or directly in front of) and (parallel to the pitcher's plate). The set position requires the pivot to be parallel to the rubber. So the bottom right position is an illegal hybrid.

As depicted, that position is going to look hybrid, and we should probably address it. If F1 slides the front foot forward a little just a few inches, it will rotate his pivot foot some, and it's going to look like a set. I'm not getting out my protractor to assess "parallel," but I do nip the hybrid position in the bud, because that's what my state wants.

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Maven,

Trust me on this, any question that says "toe and toe" meant "toe and heel."

I posted once (two or three years ago) after speaking to them in Indianapolis and getting a FED secretary to admit they are all aware of the misprints, but don't want to hear about it from the likes of me.

I called armed with six examples.

LawUmp? What say Ye??

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