Would you ignore the missed base?

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I was working solo in a very competitive 13U tournament. The score was tied in the bottom of the 6th inning. There was still a little time left on the clock (these were all 1:45 games).

The home team had a runner on first with one out when the batter hit a gapper into left-center. The coach waved R1 around third in order to score the go ahead run. I saw the runner miss third and he eventually touched the plate. The defensive coach immediately had his players appeal the missed base and I called him out. The OC became unglued...he had a temper tantrum about the call, insisting that his player touched the base.

Would you have looked the other way and called him safe?

The next day I overheard a story about a kid hitting a grand slam HR in the bottom of the 7th to apparently win a game 4-3. The BU called the batter out for missing second after appeal. The coach was verbally blasting the ump for not ignoring the miss.

I'd like to get some opinions of what you would do in these 2 examples. Either call it as you see it or ignore it and go home.

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Posted · Report post

I can't even conceive of ignoring it. :wow:

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Posted · Report post

I was working solo in a very competitive 13U tournament. The score was tied in the bottom of the 6th inning. There was still a little time left on the clock (these were all 1:45 games).

The home team had a runner on first with one out when the batter hit a gapper into left-center. The coach waved R1 around third in order to score the go ahead run. I saw the runner miss third and he eventually touched the plate. The defensive coach immediately had his players appeal the missed base and I called him out. The OC became unglued...he had a temper tantrum about the call, insisting that his player touched the base.

Would you have looked the other way and called him safe?

The next day I overheard a story about a kid hitting a grand slam HR in the bottom of the 7th to apparently win a game 4-3. The BU called the batter out for missing second after appeal. The coach was verbally blasting the ump for not ignoring the miss.

I'd like to get some opinions of what you would do in these 2 examples. Either call it as you see it or ignore it and go home.

No you call the out if it is appealed properly.

Do not inject yourself into the game.

Use your integrity at all times and never jeopardize it.

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Posted · Report post

Not getting home plate on a walk-off while being mobbed by teammates, maybe. Missing bases otherwise have got to be called if seen.

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Posted · Report post

I have been in that position before. You call what you see. I tell the managers in preseason that, "missing the bases is probably the biggest thing 10-12 years olds do" that DC's never appeal.

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Posted · Report post

If you see it and properly appealed you must call what you see.

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Posted · Report post

Preface: I know it was wrong, but......

This game had no outcome on the results of the season. HT up 456-0 in the top of the last inning. 2 outs on VT. A kid who rarely ever makes contact whatsoever takes one deep. HT properly appealed BR missed 2B. I know he missed it, but I don't want to be THAT guy when the game means squat and the VT is behind by at least 12. Score the run. B4 backwards Ks. Game over.

To the teams, the game didn't mean s**t.

To that player, it was the 1st time ever he went yard.

Flame away

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Posted · Report post

Preface: I know it was wrong, but......

This game had no outcome on the results of the season. HT up 456-0 in the top of the last inning. 2 outs on VT. A kid who rarely ever makes contact whatsoever takes one deep. HT properly appealed BR missed 2B. I know he missed it, but I don't want to be THAT guy when the game means squat and the VT is behind by at least 12. Score the run. B4 backwards Ks. Game over.

To the teams, the game didn't mean s**t.

To that player, it was the 1st time ever he went yard.

Flame away

Heros don't get flamed!!! I didn't see that one either!!!

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Posted · Report post

IMO the minute we start seeing selectively is the minute we stop doing our jobs

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Posted · Report post

IMO the minute we start seeing selectively is the minute we stop doing our jobs

Stick around 30 years and see how you answer. When you watch a young kid struggle for 5 or 6 years, and he sticks with it, and finally makes a great play/hit/moment. You will remember that longer than anything else you ever do. Mine was Tristin Talbot. Trout probably knows the name of his too!!

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Posted · Report post

Preface: I know it was wrong, but......

This game had no outcome on the results of the season. HT up 456-0 in the top of the last inning. 2 outs on VT. A kid who rarely ever makes contact whatsoever takes one deep. HT properly appealed BR missed 2B. I know he missed it, but I don't want to be THAT guy when the game means squat and the VT is behind by at least 12. Score the run. B4 backwards Ks. Game over.

To the teams, the game didn't mean s**t.

To that player, it was the 1st time ever he went yard.

Flame away

Why not just don't do your job from the beginning? Why are you watching if you're not going to call what you see.

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Posted · Report post

See Danny? Told ya. I hope Scott reads this and learns by example how NOT to argue a dead horse back to life. It doesn't work. That being said, I am glad Justin got his trophy ball. ;)

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Posted · Report post

IMO the minute we start seeing selectively is the minute we stop doing our jobs

Stick around 30 years and see how you answer. When you watch a young kid struggle for 5 or 6 years, and he sticks with it, and finally makes a great play/hit/moment. You will remember that longer than anything else you ever do. Mine was Tristin Talbot. Trout probably knows the name of his too!!

Danny maybe its just me but If im spot on with regards to a rule than I dont mind being "THAT GUY"

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Posted · Report post

IMO the minute we start seeing selectively is the minute we stop doing our jobs

Stick around 30 years and see how you answer. When you watch a young kid struggle for 5 or 6 years, and he sticks with it, and finally makes a great play/hit/moment. You will remember that longer than anything else you ever do. Mine was Tristin Talbot. Trout probably knows the name of his too!!

Danny maybe its just me but If im spot on with regards to a rule than I dont mind being "THAT GUY"

I hope I am alive when it happens to you. A nothing game where the young kid underdog/downtrodden/last guy always picked hits his first, maybe only, big one. You step right up there and take that home run away from him for missing a base. Go ahead. Sleep well my friend!

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Posted · Report post

IMO the minute we start seeing selectively is the minute we stop doing our jobs

Stick around 30 years and see how you answer. When you watch a young kid struggle for 5 or 6 years, and he sticks with it, and finally makes a great play/hit/moment. You will remember that longer than anything else you ever do. Mine was Tristin Talbot. Trout probably knows the name of his too!!

Danny maybe its just me but If im spot on with regards to a rule than I dont mind being "THAT GUY"

This sitch is the 1% of the time I will ever disagree with that. Justin has a lifelong memory of his 1st longball, not the time he went yard and got called out. I remember him. If I had called him out, he would forever remember me, not his hit.

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Sorry, not defending myself for not enforcing the rule. Just trying to possibly mentor a very young aspiring umpire on life lessons learned from baseball. Sports don't develop character, they reveal it.

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Posted · Report post

IMO the minute we start seeing selectively is the minute we stop doing our jobs

Stick around 30 years and see how you answer. When you watch a young kid struggle for 5 or 6 years, and he sticks with it, and finally makes a great play/hit/moment. You will remember that longer than anything else you ever do. Mine was Tristin Talbot. Trout probably knows the name of his too!!

Danny maybe its just me but If im spot on with regards to a rule than I dont mind being "THAT GUY"

I hope I am alive when it happens to you. A nothing game where the young kid underdog/downtrodden/last guy always picked hits his first, maybe only, big one. You step right up there and take that home run away from him for missing a base. Go ahead. Sleep well my friend!

maybe its just an age/experience/me-being-a-pain-in-the-ass-teenager thing :shrug:

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Posted · Report post

Sorry, not defending myself for not enforcing the rule. Just trying to possibly mentor a very young aspiring umpire on life lessons learned from baseball. Sports don't develop character, they reveal it.

completely agree with you trout on sports revealing character.....also feel free to give me tips such as these im the young ump here i get it and i appreciate the constructive criticism......i guess its a HTBT thing

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Posted · Report post

Wait awhile. You'll see how many people blast me. It's not any of those things. It's that I called at this park and watched these boys grow up. I knew the real players, and who was just lineup filler. This kid played 2 more years at the park, and tries out for the school team now but never makes the cut. His baseball days are pretty much over, and that HR ball in the glove of his cheap plastic trophy is more than likely the first thing he remembers about his baseball career. It's the only one he ever hit. I would rather he have that positive memory than every time he sees me he remembers me calling him out. For the rest of his life. THAT'S the guy I don't want to be to him.

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Posted · Report post

Wait awhile. You'll see how many people blast me. It's not any of those things. It's that I called at this park and watched these boys grow up. I knew the real players, and who was just lineup filler. This kid played 2 more years at the park, and tries out for the school team now but never makes the cut. His baseball days are pretty much over, and that HR ball in the glove of his cheap plastic trophy is more than likely the first thing he remembers about his baseball career. It's the only one he ever hit. I would rather he have that positive memory than every time he sees me he remembers me calling him out. For the rest of his life. THAT'S the guy I don't want to be to him.

i can see your point only if it was not a close game

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See Danny? Told ya. I hope Scott reads this and learns by example how NOT to argue a dead horse back to life. It doesn't work. That being said, I am glad Justin got his trophy ball. ;)

I am the co-founder and long standing President of the Dead Horse Beaters Club. I have a reputation and responsibility to uphold!

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Sorry, not defending myself for not enforcing the rule. Just trying to possibly mentor a very young aspiring umpire on life lessons learned from baseball. Sports don't develop character, they reveal it.

Hey I thought you were going to "let it go"? :wave:

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FWIW I agree with you Trout. I would let it go. I also let one go in this instance:

Runner on first. BR hits a gapper. R1 is sent home by third base coach. Play is going to be close. Ball goes high and bounces around the backstop. R1 slides in and completely covers home plate with dirt (this was a horrible field), to where you can't even see it. BR seeing the ball get away from the catcher comes home. I see where he steps, but so does F1 who had come in to cover home. The throw from the catcher is way late. F1 uses his foot to clear a part of the plate, sees that BR missed it and wants to appeal. I call him safe. Thankfully F1 never said anything to his coach to open up that can of worms, but I was not going to call an out on that.

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FWIW I agree with you Trout. I would let it go. I also let one go in this instance:

Runner on first. BR hits a gapper. R1 is sent home by third base coach. Play is going to be close. Ball goes high and bounces around the backstop. R1 slides in and completely covers home plate with dirt (this was a horrible field), to where you can't even see it. BR seeing the ball get away from the catcher comes home. I see where he steps, but so does F1 who had come in to cover home. The throw from the catcher is way late. F1 uses his foot to clear a part of the plate, sees that BR missed it and wants to appeal. I call him safe. Thankfully F1 never said anything to his coach to open up that can of worms, but I was not going to call an out on that.

a little bit different sitch. I had a run rule game going with VT gasping it's last breath when one moment in a young boy's life shined brighter than all the heavenly bodies. For that moment in time, he was the best player on the field. In town. The state. The U.S. The world. For that trip around the bases, all the cosmic tumblers fell into place, unlocking the purest form of elation that exists in every young baseball player's psyche. In that instant, he was Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, Jimie Foxx, Roger Maris, Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, Jose Canseco, Sammy Sosa, Ken Griffey Jr, Mark McGuire, David Ortiz, AND Manny Ramirez. That moment of his life transcends time and exists forever in the spirit of this wonderful game. Justin will have the memory of the joy, and I will have the story. Pretty good story so far, and I've only begun.
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scott,

FWIW, I believe you made the correct call in your sitch.

JM

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