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2012 NCAA Test

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Well, at 12:01 am tomorrow morning, the 2012 NCAA test window opens.

I am wondering what strategies you use to get you through the test?

Do you take it all at one time?

Do you break it up into smaller sections?

Or do you do something completely different?

Share your test-taking strategies here!

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Posted · Report post

And...I'm done!

Just kidding. I probably won't even start until next weekend.

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Guys, I break it up, go very slow and check every question with the rule book, I never answer off the TOP of my head, and like every standard test go with your first best answer and move on, almost every time I over-think and go back and change it, it is wrong! 10 video questions this year should be interesting, its 60 questions instead of 50, allows a few extra wrong and still passing. I have not registered yet but payday is tomorrow and I will sign up and get it started asap. No matter how thorough I usually get about a 90-94, think 92 last year. Always a few ones I just guess wrong! Good luck.

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I have seen the video questions, which I love, and they are not all cut and dry...which is the point of the test. Very excited.

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I just cut and pasted my 50 test questions on separate paper.

I think I'm going to work through them on paper first, then transfer my answers to the test on Arbiter.

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I am in the process of working through the test. I have had a few that are throwing me for a loop. I will go one at a time.

Here's the first:

R1, two outs. The starting pitcher has just been relieved by S1. The relief pitcher promptly throws the first three pitches well out of the strike zone. and then unsuccessfully attempts to pick off R1. His coach signals that he wants a second relief pitcher. S2 attempts to pick off R1 and throws the ball past F3. At that time, the PU wakes up and realizes that S1 had not completed pitching to the first batter he had faced.

a. Don't do anything and hope no one else notices the mistake.

b. Have a conference with your partner(s).

c. Let the play stand and then eject both S1 and S2

d. Let the wild pick-off play stand. Bring back S1 to finish his batter while S2 remains an eligible substitute.

Okay, so we know that S1 didn't pitch to one batter, the coach made a trip, and S2 is now in the game pitching to S1's first batter. The NCAA book says under 9-4-c(3) in the A.R. that if the umpire fails to recognize that the coach is making a second trip during the same batter, the coach is not penalized.

So he's not penalized, so S1 and S2 aren't going to be ejected, that eliminates C as a choice. I suppose you could have a conference with your partners to straighten it out, so B is a possibility. I'm thinking D at this point, but the rule book doesn't specify what do to if this happens. (At least not the part I've found so far) Anyone?

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I am in the process of working through the test. I have had a few that are throwing me for a loop. I will go one at a time.

Here's the first:

R1, two outs. The starting pitcher has just been relieved by S1. The relief pitcher promptly throws the first three pitches well out of the strike zone. and then unsuccessfully attempts to pick off R1. His coach signals that he wants a second relief pitcher. S2 attempts to pick off R1 and throws the ball past F3. At that time, the PU wakes up and realizes that S1 had not completed pitching to the first batter he had faced.

a. Don't do anything and hope no one else notices the mistake.

b. Have a conference with your partner(s).

c. Let the play stand and then eject both S1 and S2

d. Let the wild pick-off play stand. Bring back S1 to finish his batter while S2 remains an eligible substitute.

Okay, so we know that S1 didn't pitch to one batter, the coach made a trip, and S2 is now in the game pitching to S1's first batter. The NCAA book says under 9-4-c(3) in the A.R. that if the umpire fails to recognize that the coach is making a second trip during the same batter, the coach is not penalized.

So he's not penalized, so S1 and S2 aren't going to be ejected, that eliminates C as a choice. I suppose you could have a conference with your partners to straighten it out, so B is a possibility. I'm thinking D at this point, but the rule book doesn't specify what do to if this happens. (At least not the part I've found so far) Anyone?

I like "A" :no: but have to go with "D" makes the most sense. The other answers do not make sense at all!

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The key to taking a test isn't to look for what makes one answer right, but what makes the other three wrong.

Option A - stand there, do nothing, and hope no one notices. When is that ever a viable option in the umpire world?

Option B - conference. A conference for what? Finalizing post game dinner plans? Talking about the hot waitress at the place the crew hit up for lunch? Come on.

Option C - Let the play stand and they eject the two of them. Umpire error is the cause of this situation. Why would you even consider willingly ejecting someone when its your fault.

Process of elim: correct answer = D

Favourite part of the question: "At that time, the PU wakes up..." lol

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Posted · Report post

The key to taking a test isn't to look for what makes one answer right, but what makes the other three wrong.

Option A - stand there, do nothing, and hope no one notices. When is that ever a viable option in the umpire world?

Option B - conference. A conference for what? Finalizing post game dinner plans? Talking about the hot waitress at the place the crew hit up for lunch? Come on.

Option C - Let the play stand and they eject the two of them. Umpire error is the cause of this situation. Why would you even consider willingly ejecting someone when its your fault.

Process of elim: correct answer = D

Favourite part of the question: "At that time, the PU wakes up..." lol

Yeah, that's what I was about to go with. You could have a conference with your partners to make sure you handle it right if you've never had this situation come up before. Not saying everyone should, but I can see it happening.

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The key to taking a test isn't to look for what makes one answer right, but what makes the other three wrong.

Option A - stand there, do nothing, and hope no one notices. When is that ever a viable option in the umpire world?

Unfortunately I see it happen way to often.

There are times when I am watching a game and something happens and I wonder why the Umpire is not doing something.

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I just cut and pasted my 50 test questions on separate paper.

I think I'm going to work through them on paper first, then transfer my answers to the test on Arbiter.

Be careful, the order will be different when you go back, I think. I guess if you just copied it and then saved it, then it will stay the same. If you didn't save it then it will be different.

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There are times when I am watching a game and something happens and I wonder why the Umpire is not doing something.

Probably because they didn't see it or don't know what to do.

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I am in the process of working through the test. I have had a few that are throwing me for a loop. I will go one at a time.

Here's the first:

R1, two outs. The starting pitcher has just been relieved by S1. The relief pitcher promptly throws the first three pitches well out of the strike zone. and then unsuccessfully attempts to pick off R1. His coach signals that he wants a second relief pitcher. S2 attempts to pick off R1 and throws the ball past F3. At that time, the PU wakes up and realizes that S1 had not completed pitching to the first batter he had faced.

a. Don't do anything and hope no one else notices the mistake.

b. Have a conference with your partner(s).

c. Let the play stand and then eject both S1 and S2

d. Let the wild pick-off play stand. Bring back S1 to finish his batter while S2 remains an eligible substitute.

Okay, so we know that S1 didn't pitch to one batter, the coach made a trip, and S2 is now in the game pitching to S1's first batter. The NCAA book says under 9-4-c(3) in the A.R. that if the umpire fails to recognize that the coach is making a second trip during the same batter, the coach is not penalized.

So he's not penalized, so S1 and S2 aren't going to be ejected, that eliminates C as a choice. I suppose you could have a conference with your partners to straighten it out, so B is a possibility. I'm thinking D at this point, but the rule book doesn't specify what do to if this happens. (At least not the part I've found so far) Anyone?

There is no violation pertaining to visits in the question. We have a visit where coach removes his starter. Subsequant visit to sub is allowed as long as coach has a remaining conference left. The visit to the sub would be classified as the first visit even though the same batter is at bat. (same batter, different pitcher)

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Posted · Report post

Option A - stand there, do nothing, and hope no one notices. When is that ever a viable option in the umpire world?

When I have chili earlier in the day, it is.

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I am in the process of working through the test. I have had a few that are throwing me for a loop. I will go one at a time.

Here's the first:

R1, two outs. The starting pitcher has just been relieved by S1. The relief pitcher promptly throws the first three pitches well out of the strike zone. and then unsuccessfully attempts to pick off R1. His coach signals that he wants a second relief pitcher. S2 attempts to pick off R1 and throws the ball past F3. At that time, the PU wakes up and realizes that S1 had not completed pitching to the first batter he had faced.

a. Don't do anything and hope no one else notices the mistake.

b. Have a conference with your partner(s).

c. Let the play stand and then eject both S1 and S2

d. Let the wild pick-off play stand. Bring back S1 to finish his batter while S2 remains an eligible substitute.

Okay, so we know that S1 didn't pitch to one batter, the coach made a trip, and S2 is now in the game pitching to S1's first batter. The NCAA book says under 9-4-c(3) in the A.R. that if the umpire fails to recognize that the coach is making a second trip during the same batter, the coach is not penalized.

So he's not penalized, so S1 and S2 aren't going to be ejected, that eliminates C as a choice. I suppose you could have a conference with your partners to straighten it out, so B is a possibility. I'm thinking D at this point, but the rule book doesn't specify what do to if this happens. (At least not the part I've found so far) Anyone?

There is no violation pertaining to visits in the question. We have a visit where coach removes his starter. Subsequant visit to sub is allowed as long as coach has a remaining conference left. The visit to the sub would be classified as the first visit even though the same batter is at bat. (same batter, different pitcher)

Maybe I typed it wrong. I didn't mean that the coach was actually charged with a visit. I just meant that he went to the mound.

The question here is what to do with a coach who is allowed to go to the mound before the batter has completed his at-bat.

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zm

Coach is allowed to visit S1 while the same batter is at bat provided he has a conference remaining. He can't visit same pitcher twice during same batter. He can visit two different pitchers during same batter.

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Does Rule 6-3b apply here:

6-3b

The ball becomes dead and base runners return when:

Art. b.

The batter interferes with the catcher's attempt to throw out a runner who is attempting to steal second or third base.

The Question

R2, R3, no outs, 2-2 count. B1 swings and misses the next pitch. The catcher immediately attempts a pick off at third. His throw hits the batter in the batter's box and goes directly into the dugout. The batter did nothing intentionally.

a.The ball becomes dead, R3 is called out on the batter's interference, R2 is returned to second, and the batter is out on strike three.

b.Because the ball entered the dugout, both R2 and R3 score.

c.The batter is out because of the unintentional interference by R3.

d.The batter is out and the ball becomes dead. R2 and R3 are each awarded one base because the ball went into the dugout.

I'm thinking it is B, because we can't expect the batter to disappear and F2 is responsible for clearing the hitter.

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I just cut and pasted my 50 test questions on separate paper. I think I'm going to work through them on paper first, then transfer my answers to the test on Arbiter.
Be careful, the order will be different when you go back, I think. I guess if you just copied it and then saved it, then it will stay the same. If you didn't save it then it will be different.

Great tip...thank you.

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Does Rule 6-3b apply here:

6-3b

The ball becomes dead and base runners return when:

Art. b.

The batter interferes with the catcher's attempt to throw out a runner who is attempting to steal second or third base.

The Question

R2, R3, no outs, 2-2 count. B1 swings and misses the next pitch. The catcher immediately attempts a pick off at third. His throw hits the batter in the batter's box and goes directly into the dugout. The batter did nothing intentionally.

a.The ball becomes dead, R3 is called out on the batter's interference, R2 is returned to second, and the batter is out on strike three.

b.Because the ball entered the dugout, both R2 and R3 score.

c.The batter is out because of the unintentional interference by R3.

d.The batter is out and the ball becomes dead. R2 and R3 are each awarded one base because the ball went into the dugout.

I'm thinking it is B, because we can't expect the batter to disappear and F2 is responsible for clearing the hitter.

B is correct.

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zm

Coach is allowed to visit S1 while the same batter is at bat provided he has a conference remaining. He can't visit same pitcher twice during same batter. He can visit two different pitchers during same batter.

I'm confused now. He was allowed to remove S1, who had not pitched to a batter yet. I don't see what it has to do with conferences. Is D correct above?

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The catcher and his coach are engaged in a heated argument in the dugout. The coach sends his starting catcher to the locker room. On his way to the third-base coaching box, the coach tells the PU that S1 will bat in place of the starting catcher in the fourth spot in the order if S1 comes to bat in that inning.

a.S1 is not considered officially in the lineup as the fourth batter in that inning. However, should the coach change his mind before the fourth batter comes to the plate that inning and send S2 to bat, S1 is no longer eligible to enter the contest.

b.S1 is now "in the game, " and the PU should write his name in the lineup at that time. When he shows up to bat, the PU can point him in the game for the benefit of the opponents and the official scorer. The substitution becomes official when the PU writes his name on the lineup card.

c.S1 is now in the game, and the original catcher is out of the game when the coach announces his substitution to the PU between innings.

d.The coach cannot project a substitution. The coach must wait until the starting catcher's spot in the batting order comes up before announcing his substitution to the PU.

At first I was thinking that projected substitutions are not allowed, but I think that's a FED rule. I found rule 5-5-c which states: Art. c.

Any player other than the pitcher may be substituted for at any time when the ball is dead and the substituted player must take the place of the replaced player in the team's batting order. (See 5-5-e and 6-5-d A.R.)

A.R. - If the pitcher is removed from the game as a pitcher, but will remain in the game and bat for the DH, that change must be announced at the time the pitcher is removed.

So I'm leaning toward C unless I can be pointed to a rule about projected substitutions, choice A seems like a version of a projected substitution, choice B could be another option with a little more detail than C, so I really don't know. Your thoughts? What if he doesn't come to hit, could starting F2 still come out to catch?

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The catcher and his coach are engaged in a heated argument in the dugout. The coach sends his starting catcher to the locker room. On his way to the third-base coaching box, the coach tells the PU that S1 will bat in place of the starting catcher in the fourth spot in the order if S1 comes to bat in that inning.

a.S1 is not considered officially in the lineup as the fourth batter in that inning. However, should the coach change his mind before the fourth batter comes to the plate that inning and send S2 to bat, S1 is no longer eligible to enter the contest.

b.S1 is now "in the game, " and the PU should write his name in the lineup at that time. When he shows up to bat, the PU can point him in the game for the benefit of the opponents and the official scorer. The substitution becomes official when the PU writes his name on the lineup card.

c.S1 is now in the game, and the original catcher is out of the game when the coach announces his substitution to the PU between innings.

d.The coach cannot project a substitution. The coach must wait until the starting catcher's spot in the batting order comes up before announcing his substitution to the PU.

At first I was thinking that projected substitutions are not allowed, but I think that's a FED rule. I found rule 5-5-c which states: Art. c.

Any player other than the pitcher may be substituted for at any time when the ball is dead and the substituted player must take the place of the replaced player in the team's batting order. (See 5-5-e and 6-5-d A.R.)

A.R. - If the pitcher is removed from the game as a pitcher, but will remain in the game and bat for the DH, that change must be announced at the time the pitcher is removed.

So I'm leaning toward C unless I can be pointed to a rule about projected substitutions, choice A seems like a version of a projected substitution, choice B could be another option with a little more detail than C, so I really don't know. Your thoughts? What if he doesn't come to hit, could starting F2 still come out to catch?

I answered B. 5-5-b AR 2 says: A substitute becomes a player hen he has been reported to the UIC and the new player is written into the UIC's lineup card.

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Posted · Report post

I would like to read that verbatum. I have it as D without that reference. If that reference is correct, then B is correct. Sounds like NCAA is trying to out stupid FED.

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I would like to read that verbatum. I have it as D without that reference. If that reference is correct, then B is correct. Sounds like NCAA is trying to out stupid FED.

It's also in the 2011 BRD on p. 329, #520.

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I had B and I changed to to C before I posted it since it was less specific. There's nothing in the rules about a project substitution though. The reference if verbatim out of the rule book. I don't think it can be D.

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