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Radie

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    35
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About Radie

  • Birthday 04/13/1981

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Queens, NY

More information about you

  • Occupation
    Kids Fitness Instructor
  • Types/Levels of Baseball called
    Little League Baseball - Girls Softball
  • How did you hear about Umpire-Empire?
    Other (explain below)

Recent Profile Visitors

246 profile views
  1. "Reasonable" is literally my favorite word.
  2. Can you share some experience with this site? Whenever I try to reach them via a Google search (on my phone, using an adblocker), I get a message that the browser blocked my connection. They always seem to have the lowest prices, bit I'm pretty skeptical. Guessing its just a Chinese front... Which is worth the risk sometimes (if everything goes smoothly)
  3. I think this is what you are talking about... I did the old "Zoom and Enhance" thing of it in the pic posted. I don't think his foot is out.. definitely not completely... MAYBE if you say his heel is off the dirt and his toes are completely out, but even that is a stretch.. Either way, I'm not making that call.
  4. His right foot, behind the plate? (this is the closest frame I could get to the point of contact with the bat... The ball, although impossible to see, has already made contact and is one the way to the ground.. probably about 3/4ths of the way there.
  5. Seeing the video in the post at the bottom had me thinking... How many warm up tosses do you allow a substitute F2 that has to take the field because the starting F2 is ejected while in the field defensively? This video has no base runners, but I imagine that of some were in, they'd be stealing on the first pitch the sub F2 sees. (Speaking as a past F2, that F1 better try a pickoff before sending on my way)
  6. Seeing the video in this post had me thinking... How many warm up tosses do you allow a substitute F2 that has to take the field because the starting F2 is ejected while in the field defensively? This video has no base runners, but I imagine that of some were in, they'd be stealing on the first pitch the sub F2 sees. (Speaking as a past F2, that F1 better try a pickoff before sending on my way)
  7. This plays like a joke... But I bet you're dead serious... During bench clearing brawl, with automatic ejections for leaving the bench, this is the way to handle it. Yeah.... Even though someone else noted defensive players that leave their position get tossed too. That doesn't protect the lone offensive player in every situation. (Think about how many plays end up with 2 or 3 fielded around a single base runner on a single base) I think we can clean this up with a simple, but smart, 3rd-man-in rule. 3rd man in is tossed (Any subsequent player is also tossed). Unless the 3rd man is in there trying to break it up.
  8. This brings up an interesting question of the situation was slightly different... What is a fielder consider doing when he bails out at the last second if he loses sight of the ball... And I mean, last second... He's under it, waving people off... Loses it at the last moment and jerks to one side as he covers his head (or makes some other obvious "bail out" move) and obstructes a runner... When is he no longer fielding that ball? The MOMENT he bails, or does he have a half beat or so where he's still protected?
  9. Wait.. what? I know I'm new to the terminology, but I really thought I had it down and understood... But if this description is accurate then I am WAY off... I thought whatever base you start the play at is what give you your R#... And I can't recall ever seeing a B3? (Batting 3rd in the lineup?) I would think this would be labeled as follows.. 1 out, R1, R3. R1 is running on the pitch, and F4 is breaking to cover 2nd. BR hits soft blooper toward 2nd base. Can someone point me in the right direction as to where I have gone astray?
  10. Boom.
  11. I wonder if the guys do the brand covering themselves or if the equipment guys do it for them... Since it's just cosmetic, I imagine most wouldn't mind having an equipment guy just deal with it.
  12. @TheRockawayKid I'm a little late seeing this, but seeing as school is just about over.. I'll keep you in mind.
  13. Stormtrooper gear would protect you... And while they do update more often then Wilson, it is mostly cosmetic changes. The real star of the show for any Star Wars/Umpire hybrid would be Mandelorian armor.
  14. HA! I kept waiting for him to get down on his hands and knees and start blowing on it to keep it fair.
  15. To be fair... It kind of sounds interesting. I mean, check out this one (of two) review: (emphasis mine) "Author Bill Deane tells you everything you ever wanted to know about the hidden ball trick in this thoroughly researched book.The hidden ball trick (HBT) is almost as old as baseball itself. The first recorded incident was on May 20, 1872. Deane has documented 264 cases of HBT. As Deane shows, the HBT can be pulled almost any time, and it isn't just rookies who are the victims. Veterans and future Hall of Famers have found themselves on the wrong end of the embarrassing HBT.Some players consider the HBT as "bush league," and from time to time, there has been talk of banning the play.Connie Ryan, who played in the majors from 1942 to 1954, said the HBT is a "perfectly legitimate maneuver. A runner and his coach have an obligation to be on their toes to prevent it from happening."Details of the individual HBT range from just a couple sentences to 200-300 words. To Deane's credit, he offers multiple newspaper accounts of the play, if they're available. He even corresponded decades later with some of the players involved to get their version.Deane enhances the book with chapters "Tricks Gone Awry," "Unsubstantiated Possibilities," "Odds and Ends," footnotes, a bibliography, an appendix listing all 264 HBTs and an index.Deane offers a variety of interesting tidbits, such as the HBT was successful three times on May 26, 1914, throughout the book.Although this isn't a book for the casual baseball fan, those with an interest in research and baseball history will find it well worth their time. Few subjects in baseball have been as thoroughly covered and documented by a single author." At least I find this interesting... Not $44 interesting, but interesting nonetheless.