Register or Sign In to remove these ads

BCBrad

Members
  • Content count

    74
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

51 Neutral

About BCBrad

More information about you

  • Your Association Name
    BCBUA
  • Occupation
    Instructor
  • Types/Levels of Baseball called
    Baseball Canada - bantam, midget
  • How did you hear about Umpire-Empire?
    Search Engine (Google, Yahoo, Bing, ...)
  1. I agree with @MadMax and @Kckumpire about knowing the rules. Also, spend the money and get current copies of Wendelstedt manuals, BRD and Jaksa/Roder. Read them thoroughly as they are great learning opportunities for yourself. I also will take the pdfs of our national positioning/mechanics manuals and Provincial youth rulebook to printer to set printed and binded. I am lucky because most of our rules are OBR based. The great thing about having these in print is that it will make it easier to get old dogs to learn new tricks. If you show the umpire what needs to be done, rather than telling him not to do, it not a power issue between the two of you. If you frame the interpretation, positioning and mechanics in terms of what is expected of all umpires, including yourself, then it is not about what I tell you to do, but this is what is expected of all of us.
  2. @beerguy55 And @ElkOil I am not saying umpires do not make mistakes nor that excellence is not the standard we should all strive for each game. I watch many games, assessing the progress and development of umpires. I have observed many games where either: one, saw the umpire make a nice call done properly only to hear coaches and fans yell bs about the "travesty" that has been inflicted on their poor team, or two, seen a close play that I know from where I'm sitting I can't call and trust the call on the field, to hear a fan or coach with the same perspective livid about a butchered call. Until this culture changes, I am always going to question the motive of someone trying to throw an umpire under a bus. Bottom line is this: as an educator, people do not learn or progress linearly and learning, especially any psycho-motor or kinetic learning, needs to be done. This means that people learn better by getting reps in an environment that is supportive in growth and development. Usually, people don't grow when: their peer group is not dynamic by promoting dialogue for growth; feedback is critical, not constructive; they have no mentors who they trust; or, no meaningful and pragmatic learning experience exists that gives them a sense of empowerment. Finally, I have found that usually stereotypes and prejudice affects what kind of support and development people receive. I seen environments where the people who are liked get the support and training while the shunned people have to figure it out for themselves. As an educator, I know that I have to practice "don't judge, understand" in giving each person the quality time they need to grow and develop. It is amazing and humbling sometimes how people change and blossom when they feel like someone sees them as a person, not as a preconceived idea of who they are. Intrinsic excellence and high expectations usually is fostered from a trusted and respectful learning environment. People take ownership to the achievement of excellence when their effort on the field is matched with a passion to raise their best. My goal as a UIC or educator is to nurture that intrinsic motivation in others. That is what I take to the field to support and educate developing umpires. I don't think that is what a coach has in mind. PS. Does playing in a band on weekends, make you a professional musician? For most umpires I know, we are not doing it because of the honourarium we get for the game. We do it because one way or another, we feel a civic duty or responsibility to contribute to our communities. Umpiring is the way we participate and volunteer as a citizen in our hometowns.
  3. In a younger age group, the f-bomb may be enough for ejection. I probably would have talked directly to F2 about the unsportsmanlike comment; I would have kept Bats out of it unless they were jarring back and forth. I would warn F2 for insulting opposing team as this is unacceptable and any other verbal or physical incident will lead to watching the Blue Jays lose on his cell. Bottom line is this. You want the behaviour to stop as it is not tolerated. If your comment got the job done, to cease the BS from F2, then I'm good with that. Sometimes, we have to deal with situations our own way.
  4. Your TD is full of crap. Yes we have a different culture, but we still play by the same rule book. There is no difference in tolerance for jackasses on the field. In fact in my province, we have zero tolerance in our major youth program. The coaches can only come out to make changes, ask about rule interpretation or to protest a game. Our IAWE levels are pretty thin. Problem is that going to the US for a tourney in Canada is an act of prestige. Coaches, players and parents look at the sojourn to the lower 48 as a status thing that they brag about back home. Our team/organization is better than yours because we played in a tourney in the US. This patronizing/condescending BS is very un-Canadian.
  5. In my province, our provincial organization negotiates agreements and standards with various organizations, youth and adult. I know some people like being a private contractor, but sometimes you need a umpire association to represent umpires in negotiation of standards and fees for assigned umpires with leagues and assignors. Even at my local youth association, we have decided that if the umpire is at the game when it is called then full game fees are to be paid. The onus is the home team to cancel the game in a timely manner. Even if the umpire is in transit, full fees are paid. Me thinks if the assigning body is saying tough noogies to umpires who have games cancelled, then there are probably too many non-officiating people with their hands in the cookie jar. If a day of rain is putting them into financial peril, then maybe they should not be assigning games. I wonder if they still got paid for assigning those games.
  6. This part of the rule book (pg. 75) involves doctoring the baseball. (2) expectorate on the ball, either hand or his glove; (3) rub the ball on his glove, person or clothing; (4) apply a foreign substance of any kind to the ball; (5) deface the ball in any manner; or (6) deliver a ball altered in a manner prescribed by Rule 6.02(c)(2) through (5) or what is called the “shine” ball, “spit” ball, “mud” ball or “emery” ball. The pitcher is allowed to rub the ball between his bare hands. (7) Have on his person, or in his possession, any foreign sub- stance. These are the instances that has an option. It does not apply to quick pitches and not in contact with rubber illegal pitches. With runners on base, balk. @Senor Azul case example applicable to op, and something tells me if I look at my 2016 Wendelstedt, I'd find the same case example. Not one of 2017 changed involves illegal pitches. May be in the future be more clear about what you are quoting. Myths get started when the rule book is taken out of context.
  7. This broken record drives me, as a UIC of a youth association trying to develop young umpires, nuts. 1. We, as umpires, do not umpire to the court of public opinion; we umpire by interpreting what we saw. 2. Unless all of you at the game have 10-12 cameras and a control centre in New York, what makes you think you saw the play any better? Did you see what happened or what you wanted to see? HTBT. 3. This is not a misinterpretation of the rules, this is a judgment call. No umpire by her/himself is going to overturn a judgment call after listening to the peanut gallery. That is just a nightmare waiting to happen. 4. If it is a misinterpretation of the rules, protest the game. As an association UIC, I don't want any coach or parent or spectator telling a developing umpire (who are usually working this level) what the call should be. 5. To #4, at this level, we have our entry level umpires who are probably 12-13 years old and in their first year. At this level, I don't care if they call your batter out on a Scooby Doo, the play stands. In protecting younger umpires from being bullied or intimidated, our provincial code states all calls on the field stand at this level. The coaches should contact the UIC of the situation if it is such a misinterpretation of the rules. It is my responsibility to tell the young umpire there is no Scooby Doo in the rule book, not the coach. 6. This situation in the OP is probably due to bad positioning or mechanics, again that is something a UIC should work with the umpire, not the coach. Bottom line is this. I don't tell your infielders how to field after they booted five ground balls and turned a inning in 34 C (92 F) into 30 minutes of horror. Don't tell my 13-year-old umpire that in a rundown between 1st and 2nd and the ball gets thrown out the play, R1 should be on 2nd base (1+1).
  8. Not all of us put eh after a sentence. However, I always say, "all of you."
  9. How come I get the feeling I could substitute woman or African-American for person in a wheelchair into some of these posts, and feel I was back in the 1950s. Everyone here is demonstrating the classic stereotype of people with a disability. Your reasoning conveys that because of a chair, they are immobile, or they are a risk to getting hit. May be all people with a disability should be shut-ins so all you dinosaurs don't have to degrade another person with your condescending pity. (Note: No "I got family or friends with a disability" stories to try to prove you are not prejudice.). My take is this: Technology is evolving and there are many ways solve obstacles and barriers for people with disabilities to participate in many aspects of our culture, including sports. People with disabilities, or differently abled, or people with assisted technology already demonstrate that assumptions about their abilities are incorrect. Just look at the para-Olympic games. Get out of your generalized preconceived ideas of what a person with a disability can't do and open your eyes at the abilities of each person. People may surprise you and break down your preconceived ideas. Finally, sports is a place to demonstrate what we believe in, and teaches children these values. What do you teach a child playing baseball when they see an umpire with a disability participating in this great game? I know in my province we have a challenger baseball field in Vancouver for all children to enjoy baseball. If you build it, they will come.
  10. @lawump, I do not have the skill or experience you have, so please take the following with a grain of salt. If there is something that is helpful, I glad I could share some ideas. I think the hard thing is if we only work with someone may be once in a year. We only see a snap shot of that umpire's development. As others have noted, you do not know enough of that person to work together and get better by giving constructive feedback. Yet, there are some things to try. I think the first thing is to model the professionalism yourself. Show your expectations. I will say to partners that I like to be alone between innings because it keeps me focused, or after the pre-game, I hope we don't talk again until after the game because it means we had a good game. Even, this is what we do between innings because that is what the association manual says. Model what you expect. Another option is to tell a story of how you got better. What helped you to elevate your game. May be talk about what you learned from an advanced clinic from a MLB umpire. Centre your small talk around umpiring. If that person is in a new level, it may be a chance for you in supporting their development. If not, at least you can informally negotiate your expectations through your stories. They may be defensive in the moment, but long-term they will incorporate the ideas if they are a team player. I think we have to be able to share ideas respectfully and constructively without it being taken personally. I may be lucky, but I work games with umpires from 17-71 and everyone is curious to learn, to better their best. We learn from each other. Everyone is different. I have cerebral approach and do not like small talk when I umpire. However, a part of me cringes when I hear the "partner from hell" stories, because of the passing of judgment that can de-humanize a partner. To other people, we could be the "partner from hell." People can have different styles, skills and temperament. But, what is important is that we do want to learn and grow collaboratively. I guess @lawump the only "partner from hell" is the one who does not want to learn.
  11. I think, as umpires, that we should make the right call, not the easy call. Granted, we have to take the level and situation into consideration, but the calls that are the skeletons in our umpire closet, are the one's we knew we should have called. Last year, I had a couple of CI's that at the moment, I was not sure there was a touch. Only afterwards, did I kick myself for being passive. One of these, the catcher afterwards asked quietly if there was a penalty for hitting his glove. If I could, I would have smacked myself in the back of the head. I let my second-guessing miss the call. Nobody knew; nobody complained, but it still lingers with me. This lingering of missed calls drives me to learn from it and to be more active in what I see. I think if you see it, call it. Ultimately, I can go home enjoying my game if I called what I saw and did my best. Learning along the way to always elevate that best. Outside the lane. RLI.
  12. I think that sometimes in rules interpretation clinics or sessions, we focus on the rule and under emphasize the application/penalty. The developing umpires probably called umpire interference correctly, but didn't know what to do afterwards.
  13. What I tried to do was use as the XV original upper strap. Used a two rectangular hoops that work great for securing the straps of the delta flex. Followed @MadMax original retrofit for connecting the bottom two straps. Did my own stitching (Charlie Brown style), but would like to get a cobbler or leather worker to do a custom job.
  14. I'd second @BT_Blue on the Schutt's XV. Like him, took @MadMax advice and self-retroed a delta-flex on it (see image). Fit nice and stays snug, protecting my clavicle. I have taken foul shots off it and never felt it. Previously, had a Rawlings soft-shell and after a few bruises on my chest, (looked like I was in a fight), decided I needed a hard shell. As @Stk004 said, "Hard shell, hard shell, hard shell."
  15. I am a little confused (okay I am always confused ) why isn't the batter automatically out (R1<2outs)? R1 out on pick off; three outs inning over.