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ElkOil

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Everything posted by ElkOil

  1. ElkOil

  2. So back to my other question... why wouldn't you call INT on this?
  3. With batter INT, for example, one of the criteria we use to determine if INT occurred is if the catcher's throw didn't retire a runner. Wouldn't the same be true here? Since the throw to 1B didn't retire the runner, wouldn't we call INT? After my first viewing, I could see myself making the double play call.
  4. new umpire

    Did the umpire indicate it was, or is there a question about how the call was handled? To the technical aspects of the situation, it's an infield fly if the following criteria are met: 1. Less than two out. 2. Force play in effect at 3B ( so bases loaded or runners on 1B and 2B). 3. Fly ball is hit (as @noumpere said, it has to be high enough in the umpire's judgement). No infield fly is in effect on a bunted ball. 4. An infielder must be able to catch it using ordinary effort. Note that this does not mean it has to be caught by an infielder nor does it mean that the ball is over the infield.
  5. What to look for here?

    I gotta disagree on this, which becomes particularly important at the levels of ball we all call. Selling this call is more important on our fields than an MLB diamond since they just go to video review if someone disagrees. In this video, U1 was anything but set. He casually walked into position, remained upright, sort of wavered around while the play was happening, then gave an extremely quick safe call. Right, wrong or otherwise, any coach at our levels would be right to think we missed it because we weren't set and our timing was off. So to the OP, I suggest that this is less about what we look at, since everyone else already gave good input about how difficult that is on this play, and more about the fundamentals of hustling into position, getting set like you're ready, taking that extra second, then selling your call. Since we can't go to video, that's all we got.
  6. Show me where I said it was, Rich. I never so much as implied it. What IS squarely in the purview of the umpire is game management, including calling time when necessary -- even if the batter didn't request it. The umpire's need for a time out is as valid as anyone else's. That was my only point relative to the OP. And as for my point relative to you, get some training, gear up, get behind the plate and stay active on this forum. Then you'll understand our frustration when you read posts from people like who you were before. Instead of criticizing our ranks, join them.
  7. Looks like Hallion was flirting with the Yellow Zone.
  8. The umpire is the only person in the game who can call time. Everyone else only requests it. It's his prerogative to manage the game as he sees fit, and he also needs to be ready for the pitch. If the umpire isn't ready, he can call time for his own sake. At no level does this rise to "interjecting himself into the game." You should try being an umpire some time. You'd get quite an education and I'm confident your demeanor and opinions towards them would change for the better.
  9. Baseball

    ...which I did. Foul ball.
  10. Baseball

    I agree that we weren't presented a conclusion and have limited information. My view is that assuming the ball is still moving is just as valid as assuming it isn't. I chose to answer based on the latter assumption in order to give an answer. When you read as many posts in the Ask the Umpire section, it's remarkable how so many simple questions get dissected to the Nth degree and we wind up calling a clear blue sky red and convincing ourselves it's true. We tend to over-think and over-analyze. I made an effort to simplify the process. When a non-umpire asks what they think is an easy question, we have a collective bad habit of giving analysis instead of an answer.
  11. Baseball

    Given the brevity of the OP, I added some criteria that would allow me to answer the question. Read through almost any other post in this section of the forum to see that we all do it out of necessity because we are often asked incomplete questions. And given my initial interpretation of said incomplete question, and picturing what I can only imagine to be the type of play described as it was, I gave my answer. It sure beats shrugging and saying "I don't know" or "we can't know." Foul ball. It's even simpler than you describe.
  12. Baseball

    Once it's called foul, it is foul. If the ball comes to rest untouched, it is foul. There is never a time when a ball sitting idly in foul territory is fair. You're adding confusion to a very straight-forward situation.
  13. Baseball

    When a foul is called, the ball is foul. Particularly in FED, and the call cannot be reversed. The ball can be called foul at any point, but by Rich's logic, even a ball that is obviously foul and as I stated, has come to rest untouched and before reaching 1B, isn't actually foul unless it's touched or passes the base. Are you telling me that a ball that dribbles 10 feet from home in foul ground and stops isn't actually a foul ball because nobody touched it and it hasn't passed 1B? We would all call that a foul, and don't try to make me believe otherwise. I'm not citing any rule that says anything about a ball having a chance of becoming fair. But why do we not call anything when a ball is close to the line and wait for something to develop? Because there's a chance it could become fair. The inverse is true that the reason we call obviously foul balls that have no chance of becoming fair, foul, is because they are just that. The OP had a simple question. Why in the world are you trying to make it more difficult than it has to be?
  14. Baseball

    Sorry, Coach, that's incorrect. If the ball is untouched and hasn't passed 1B and has no chance of becoming fair, it's foul. By your logic, if a ball is batted into foul territory and caroms off the dugout or wall, then comes to rest in foul territory, it's nothing. Plus, it is by definition foul once the umpire calls it so. In FED, this cannot be undone. Thanks for playing umpire. Try again next time.
  15. Baseball

    Foul.
  16. Why wasn't an out

    Is it possible you missed something, like the ball bouncing before the fielder caught it? Did you see an umpire make a call like a safe signal when the ball was caught by the third baseman?
  17. Honigs

    Send them an email saying you're a Nigerian prince. They fall for that one every time.
  18. Mr

    Do you mean to ask if a ball held in a fielder's glove would be something besides a catch and instead be considered lodged in his equipment? If so, it's a catch. A ball lodged in a uniform or touched by detached player equipment is something else entirely. For example, if the player threw his glove at the ball or if a batted ball ran into his jersey and became stuck, then you'd have a lodged ball scenario.
  19. Broken bones are weird like that. You can get hit over and over, then one time it hits you just right (or wrong) and something breaks.
  20. Or why he had to leave the game for getting hit in the arm?
  21. Ball bounces

    Depends on where the ball winds up. If it's a foul ball before two strikes, it's a strike. If it's a fair ball, it's in play. It's no different for having bounced first than if it didn't.
  22. Ladies and gentlemen, I present Kerwin Danley. The glass umpire.
  23. Between the Pitch FX thing on the screen, the narrative on the CCS site and my own understanding of a strike zone, I have no idea what to believe any more. Next, you'll probably tell me Santa Claus isn't real.
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