Register or Sign In to remove these ads

Senor Azul

Members
  • Content count

    361
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2

Senor Azul last won the day on January 2 2016

Senor Azul had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

139 Neutral

About Senor Azul

  • Birthday 07/16/1947

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    San Francisco Bay Area

More information about you

  • Your Association Name
    NCTB, YUA
  • How did you hear about Umpire-Empire?
    Search Engine (Google, Yahoo, Bing, ...)

Recent Profile Visitors

3,029 profile views
  1. Since the OP did not specify a rule set, I will answer with a case play from Fed—7.3.5 SITUATION G: With no outs and F1 in the set position, R3 attempts to steal home. F1 legally steps backward off the pitcher’s plate and throws home. B2 hits the ball. RULING: Typically, batter’s interference is a delayed dead ball in order to give the defense an opportunity to make an out on the initial putout attempt. Since the batter hit the ball, the defense was not afforded an opportunity to make a play. Therefore, the ball is declared dead immediately. R3 is out because of B2’s interference. (5-1-2a, 7-3-5, 8-4-2l) And in the video of Justin Verlander pitching against the Oakland A’s, he was charged with a balk (for an illegal pitch with a runner on). The runner was on first base—there was no runner at third. It’s in the box score and play-by-play of the game that can be found at retrosheet.org.
  2. I think the NCAA rule cited earlier is rule 6-4a and I do not think it is the applicable rule to the OP. Let’s try NCAA rule 4-8 instead: Nongame Personnel Interference SECTION 8. If there is interference with a live batted or thrown ball by anyone other than players, coaches or umpires, the umpire shall rule as to its being intentional or unintentional. a. If it is intentional, the ball shall be declared dead at the moment of the interference, and the umpire shall award the offended team appropriate compensation that, in his opinion, would have resulted had interference not taken place. 1) It is intentional interference if a coach, bat person, photographer or home field attendant fields, kicks or pushes a ball, regardless of possible motives. 2) The umpire shall declare intentional interference and award just compensation, be it an out, extra bases, etc., if a spectator intentionally reaches out of the stands or goes out onto the playing field. The ball is dead immediately. b. If it is unintentional interference, the ball is live and in play. It is unintentional interference if a base coach, bat person, photographer, etc., tries to evade the ball and it touches the individual or if it touches such person without the person being aware the ball was coming. c. It is not interference if, as the player is going outside the playing field during a play, a spectator i
  3. Thank you, Mr. noumpere. I thought it was strange that the rule you cited used the term golf glove. That’s why I asked. I also have a 2014 edition of the PBUC and that bit of text you quoted appears (paragraph 3.13 on page 20) as: “No pitcher shall be allowed to wear a batting glove while pitching. Other defensive players may wear a batting glove on their glove hand, but they shall not rub the ball with the batting glove on their hand.”
  4. Mr. noumpere, could you give us a full citation for the rule (2.10) you cited please. Which rule book or case book did it come from?
  5. In NCAA and Fed there is rule support to stop this kind of behavior. NCAA rule 5-17 Verbal Abuse (Bench Jockeying) SECTION 17. Game personnel shall not use language that will, in any manner, refer to or reflect negatively upon opposing players, coaches, umpires or spectators. Any orchestrated activities by dugout personnel designed to distract, intimidate, or disconcert the opposing team or reflect poor sportsmanship shall not be allowed. PENALTY—The umpire shall warn the offending individual and the coach one time. If the verbal abuse continues after the warning, the offender shall be ejected. If the verbal abuse continues after the first ejection, the head coach shall be ejected along with any other offending personnel. Note An individual ejected for bench jockeying shall not be suspended unless it is unsportsmanlike in nature. Federation Official Interpretation: Hopkins: A team has developed an orchestrated team action to cheer on a teammate to get a rally going. As long as the action is within the spirit of fair play and not intended to induce a balk, create a distraction for the other team, or intimidate/demean them, the action is legal. EXCEPT: A team may not pound bats in the dugout when a pitcher begins to deliver. That is obviously intended to gain an advantage and will not be permitted. (Website 2014 #12) (also 3-3-1g, 3-3-1g Pen, and 3.3.1g, h, I, and j)
  6. I think the "MJ" part is in remembrance of the following former MLB umpire: Mark Stephen Johnson (November 18, 1950 – October 26, 2016) was a professional baseball umpire who worked in the American League from 1979 to 1999, wearing uniform number 25 when the AL adopted them in 1980. Johnson was an umpire in the 1993 World Series and the 1990 and 1999 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. In his career, he umpired 1,979 Major League games.
  7. Here’s the relevant Official Baseball Rule: OBR 3.03 (1.11) Player Uniforms (b) (1.11(a)(2)) Any part of an undershirt exposed to view shall be of a uniform solid color for all players on a team. Any player other than the pitcher may have numbers, and /or letters, insignia attached to the sleeve of the undershirt. And here’s a case play from the 2013 WRIM (pp. 282-283): A substitute pitcher enters the game in the middle of an inning and the plate umpire notices that he is wearing a warm-up sleeve just on his non-pitching arm. Ruling: The umpire should immediately have the pitcher either remove the warm-up sleeve, or put on another sleeve on his throwing arm, in order that the sleeves are approximately the same length.
  8. From the 2016 Baseball Rule Differences by Carl Childress (section 338, p. 222): R1, R2, 0 outs. B1 pops up on the first-base line. The umpire declares: “Infield fly if fair.” As F3 is waiting in fair territory to catch the fly, BR bumps into him. The umpire calls: “That’s interference!” The ball remains alive. The first baseman touches the ball in (a) fair territory and makes the catch; or (b) foul territory and drops the ball. Ruling: In (a) and (b), BR is out. In (a), the ball remains alive: BR is out on the infield fly, and the umpire ignores the interference. The defense may play on R1 or R2. In (b), BR is out for interference, and the ball is immediately dead. Runners remain TOI. Case play covers all three codes.
  9. Triple with runner thrown out at home trying for an inside-the-park home run Triple with runner thrown out at home trying for an inside-the-park home run Triple (base coach finally gets smart and stops his runner at third) Double--a bloop hit that just falls in--runner on third has to hold fearing a catch and can't score Single--batter beats out a tapper in front of the plate and runners can't advance Single—batter hits a hard shot that the runner cannot avoid and is hit by the fair batted ball—third out on the interference and batter is awarded first base and a base hit Six hits (3 triples, 1 double, 2 singles) and 13 total bases with no runs.
  10. The 2017 OBR rule book mentions the new intentional base on balls rule in five places but fails to mention the status of the ball during the play. Here are the references to the new intentional base on balls rule—Summary of Rule Changes, Definition of Base on Balls, rule 5.05(b)(1) Comment, rule 6.08(a) Comment, and in the scorekeeping rule 9.14(d). The new rule has been used at least twice so far this season and both of these plays can be found at MLB Video. I watched both and did not see the plate umpire call time. It seems the intentional walk is meant to occur during live ball.
  11. There are two famous “shoeshine incidents” and they both took place in a World Series game and they both involved players named Jones. Thanks to Mr. Gfoley4 for providing video of the second incident and here is text from Wikipedia about the first one. Nippy Jones is remembered for being involved in a controversial "Shoeshine incident" in the 1957 Series, that would be repeated twelve years later by Cleon Jones in the 1969 World Series. Jones pinch hit in games one and three of the 1957 World Series, grounding out both times. Both of which games were also won by the Yankees. Game four went into extra innings, and when the Yankees took a 5–4 lead in the tenth, the Braves were looking at the possibility of falling three games to one in the series. Jones led off the Milwaukee half of the tenth inning, pinch hitting for Warren Spahn. He jumped back from a low pitch that home plate umpire Augie Donatelli called a ball. Jones protested that it had hit his foot, and he was awarded first base after showing Donatelli a shoe polish mark on the ball to prove it. Yankees manager Casey Stengel vehemently protested the call, but to no avail. The Braves scored three runs in the tenth, including a two-run home run by Eddie Mathews to end the game and even the series at two games apiece. The play was the turning point in the series, as the Braves went on to win the series in seven games.
  12. The applicable rule is 9.06b. It tells us that your hit would be scored as a single and your advancement on the throw would be scored as a fielder’s choice. OBR 9.06 Determining Value of Base Hits The official scorer shall score a base hit as a one-base hit, two-base hit, three-base hit or home run when no error or putout results, as follows…: (b) When, with one or more runners on base, the batter advances more than one base on a safe hit and the defensive team makes an attempt to put out a preceding runner, the scorer shall determine whether the batter made a legitimate two-base hit or three-base hit, or whether the batter-runner advanced beyond first base on the fielder’s choice. Rule 9.06 Comment:... A batter may deserve a two base hit even though a preceding runner advances one or no bases; a batter may deserve only a one-base hit even though he reaches second base and a preceding runner advances two bases. For example: (1) Runner on first. Batter hits to right fielder, who throws to third base in an unsuccessful attempt to put out runner. Batter takes second base. The official scorer shall credit batter with one-base hit.
  13. The applicable rule is OBR 9.08(c): The official scorer shall: not score a sacrifice bunt when any runner is put out attempting to advance one base on a bunt, or would have been put out, except for a fielding error, in which case the official scorer shall charge the batter with a time at bat; So, if a play is made on a runner, and the runner is safe because of an error, the batter does not get credit for a sacrifice bunt. Score a fielder’s choice on the batter and the advancement of the runner on the error.
  14. In NCAA and Fed there is rule support to stop this kind of behavior. NCAA rule 5-17 Verbal Abuse (Bench Jockeying) SECTION 17. Game personnel shall not use language that will, in any manner, refer to or reflect negatively upon opposing players, coaches, umpires or spectators. Any orchestrated activities by dugout personnel designed to distract, intimidate, or disconcert the opposing team or reflect poor sportsmanship shall not be allowed. PENALTY—The umpire shall warn the offending individual and the coach one time. If the verbal abuse continues after the warning, the offender shall be ejected. If the verbal abuse continues after the first ejection, the head coach shall be ejected along with any other offending personnel. Note An individual ejected for bench jockeying shall not be suspended unless it is unsportsmanlike in nature. Federation Official Interpretation: Hopkins: A team has developed an orchestrated team action to cheer on a teammate to get a rally going. As long as the action is within the spirit of fair play and not intended to induce a balk, create a distraction for the other team, or intimidate/demean them, the action is legal. EXCEPT: A team may not pound bats in the dugout when a pitcher begins to deliver. That is obviously intended to gain an advantage and will not be permitted. (Website 2014 #12) (also 3-3-1g, 3-3-1g Pen, and 3.3.1g, h, I, and j)
  15. From the 2016 BRD (section 327, p. 216): FED: Point not covered. Official Interpretation: Hopkins: If an on-deck batter picks up a live ball: (1) With runners not moving, the ball is simply dead; (2) with runners moving, the ball is dead and the runner on whom the defense would have played is out. If the umpire cannot determine which runner, the one nearer home is out. (Website 2003 #19)