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Senor Azul

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Senor Azul last won the day on August 14

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About Senor Azul

  • Birthday 07/16/1947

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  1. Rule 9.05(a)(5) is actually a reflection of rule 5.05(b)(4) which says: The batter becomes a runner and is entitled to first base without liability to be put out (provided he advances to and touches first base) when: A fair ball touches an umpire or runner on fair territory before touching a fielder. When a runner is called out for being hit by a batted ball in fair territory that out is referred to as an automatic out. Since there is no such thing as a team putout in baseball the putout must be assigned to a specific defensive player. In this case, the putout is credited to the defensive player closest to the ball—for example, 4U (no assists are to be credited) for the putout in your scenario.
  2. Mr. Poj, the game you asked about was played the night of May 1, 1984, in Detroit. You can find the boxscore and play-by-play at retrosheet.org and at baseball-reference.com. Here’s the relevant portion from the play-by-play found at retrosheet: TIGERS 4TH: Castillo doubled; Hurst balked [Castillo to third]; Red Sox 2B Jerry Remy was called for a balk against Detroit; the Tigers' Marty Castillo had doubled but the Red Sox thought he had missed 1B; Bruce Hurst went to the mound and made the appeal throw to Mike Easler while Remy backed up the play in foul territory; Darrell Evans went to Tigers manager Sparky Anderson to remind him that only the catcher can be in foul territory when the pitcher is on the rubber; Anderson appealed the appeal and a balk was called, sending Castillo to 3B; Rule 4.03 discussed fielders in foul ground, but did not specifically address this situation or the awarding of a balk; For Mr. Richvee, the losing pitcher in this game was Bruce Hurst of the Red Sox whose middle name is Vee. Perhaps he is related or your favorite player?
  3. Mr. Richvee, I did not input any of the pace-of-play rules. I copied and pasted from an article found at the MILB website. I found another article dated March 24, 2015, making the announcement of the rules and the text was the same. So, if it is a typo it has been there from the beginning. And thanks to Mr. Old Skool for adding a very important detail. The second article I found did mention that the pace-of-play rules were adopted for all Double-A and Triple-A baseball and were to begin on May 1, 2015.
  4. No, it is not a catch or an out because it no longer meets the requirements of the following definitions found in the rule book: A CATCH is the act of a fielder in getting secure possession in his hand or glove of a ball in flight and firmly holding it… IN FLIGHT describes a batted, thrown, or pitched ball which has not yet touched the ground or some object other than a fielder.
  5. 20/30-Second Pitch Timer -Pitchers will be allowed 20 seconds to begin their wind-up or the motion to come to the set position. -The pitcher does not necessarily have to release the ball within 20 seconds, but must begin his wind-up or begin the motion to come to the set position to comply with the 20-second rule. -For the first pitch of an at-bat (after the first batter), a 30-second timer shall start immediately following the conclusion of the previous play. te. -All timers will stop as soon as the pitcher begins his wind-up, or begins the motion to come to the set position. -If the pitcher feints a pick off or steps off the rubber with runners on base, the timer shall reset and start again immediately. -Umpires have the authority to stop the timer and order a reset. -Following any event (e.g., pick-off play) that permits the batter to leave the batter's box, the timer shall start when the pitcher has possession of the ball in the dirt circle surrounding the pitcher's rubber, and the batter is in the dirt circle surrounding home plate. -Following an umpire's call of "time" or if the ball becomes dead and the batter remains at-bat, the timer shall stop (blank screen) and start again after the following pitch. -Should the pitcher fail to begin his wind-up or begin the motion to come to the set position in 20/30 seconds, a ball will be awarded to the count on the batter.
  6. From the official minor league website, milb.com: These procedures, created in partnership with Major League Baseball, will monitor the time taken between innings and pitches, and will limit the amount of time allowed during pitching changes. Umpires will continue to enforce rules prohibiting batters from leaving the batter's box between pitches. Timers have been installed at all Triple-A including Coca-Cola Field, in plain view of umpires, players and fans to monitor the pace of play and determine when violations occur. The regulations and penalties for non-compliance are listed below. Between Inning Breaks -Inning breaks will be two minutes, 25 seconds in duration. The first batter of an inning is encouraged to be in the batter's box and alert to the pitcher with 20 seconds left on the inning break timer. The pitcher must begin his wind-up or begin the motion to come to the set position at any point within the last 20 seconds of the 2:25 break. -Should the pitcher fail to begin his wind-up or begin the motion to come to the set position in the last 20 seconds of the inning break, the batter will begin the at-bat with a 1-0 count. -Should the batter fail to be in the batter's box and alert to the pitcher with five or more seconds remaining on the inning break timer, the batter will begin the at-bat with a 0-1 count. -Umpires will have the authority to grant extra time between innings should special circumstances arise. -The inning break timer will begin with the final out of the previous half-inning. For inning breaks during which God Bless America or any patriotic song is played in which all action in the ballpark stops (similar to the national anthem), the timer will begin at the conclusion of the song.
  7. RLI

    There was a related case play from the 2004 revisions: SITUATION 20: As B1 bunts, F2 fields the ball in front of home plate in fair ground. B1 is running in fair ground as he nears first base. F2 realizes he does not have a line of sight to F3 and tries to lob the ball over B1. F3 leaps but cannot catch the ball. RULING: B1 is out for interference. Although F2 made an errant throw, B1 is guilty of interference by being out of the 3-foot running lane. (8-4-1g)
  8. From the 2013 Wendelstedt Rules and Interpretations Manual (p. 177): “A runner that is running the entire distance outside of the running lane will not be protected if he interferes with a play at first base, even if it is in his last stride or step to the base. In order to be protected, this last step must be when he first exits the running lane.”
  9. Mr

    From the 2015 NFHS Baseball Case Book: 5.1.1 SITUATION S: With a runner on first base, on a bounding ball F6 lays out and catches the ball in his glove. After several attempts to remove the ball from his glove, he is finally successful after the batter-runner acquires first base. RULING: There is no base awarded; the play stands. The ball was temporarily stuck, not lodged, in F6’s glove.
  10. The OP asked for a ruling for all three codes and NCAA was not covered. NCAA actually has a pretty comprehensive collision rule: Collision Rule RULE 8 SECTION 7. The rules committee is concerned about unnecessary and violent collisions with the catcher at home plate, and with infielders at all bases. The intent of this rule is to encourage base runners and defensive players to avoid such collisions whenever possible. a. When there is a collision between a runner and a fielder who is in clear possession of the ball, the umpire shall judge: If the defensive player blocks the base (plate) or base line with clear possession of the ball, the runner may slide into to make contact with the fielder as long as the runner is making a legitimate attempt to reach the base (plate). 1) The runner must make an actual attempt to reach the base (plate). PENALTY—If the runner attempts to dislodge the ball or initiates an avoidable collision, the runner shall be declared out, even if the fielder loses possession of the ball. The ball is dead and all other base runners shall return to the last base touched at the time of the collision. 2) The runner may not attempt to dislodge the ball from the fielder--contact above the waist shall be judged by the umpire as an attempt by the runner to dislodge the ball. PENALTY—If the contact is flagrant or malicious before the runner touches the base (plate), the runner shall be declared out and also ejected from the contest. The ball is immediately dead and all other base runners shall return to the last base touched at the time of the collision. 3) The runner must attempt to avoid a collision if he can reach the base without colliding. PENALTY—If the contact is flagrant or malicious after the runner touches the base (plate), the runner is safe, but is ejected from the contest. The ball is immediately dead and all other base runners shall return to the last base touched at the time of the collision. If this occurs at any base other than home, the offending team may replace the runner. If the contact occurs after a preceding runner touches home plate, the preceding runner is safe. The ball is immediately dead and all other base runners shall return to the last base touched at the time of the contact.
  11. According to Carl Childress in the 2016 edition of his Baseball Rules Differences (section 348, p. 232), there is an official interpretation concerning malicious contact for the MLB: “The umpire has the right to eject (a player) from the game if it’s (the contact) blatant, and he’d be automatically out.” [Joe Torre, MLB.com, 2/24/14] So as it turns out, the OBR is not entirely silent on non-interference contact.
  12. Here’s an example, Mr. BrianC14, of a conditional winning run-- From the 2016 BRD (section 508, p. 326): Official Interpretation: Wendelstedt: If the winning run is awarded home because the ball became dead, such as, but not limited to when a ball is thrown out of play, or when a batted ball is hit out of play for a home run the game will not be over until all runners reach the bases they are awarded to. (WRIM section 5.5.4.a, p. 69) Example P: R3 (winning run), R2, one out. The batter hits a ground ball to the shortstop, who looks R3 back to third before throwing to first. The throw sails over the first baseman’s head and out of play. Ruling: We would award both runners home and wait for both to advance, or not, before calling the game over. We also require that they both reach their award or be in jeopardy of being called out for abandoning their effort to run the bases.
  13. Does rule 7.01(g)(3), the game-winning run rule, override or negate the two following rules? 5.05 (6.09) When the Batter Becomes a Runner (b) (6.08) The batter becomes a runner and is entitled to first base without liability to be put out (provided he advances to and touches first base) when: (1) Four “balls” have been called by the umpire; Rule 5.06(b)(4)(I) Comment (Rule 7.05(i ) Comment): The fact a runner is awarded a base or bases without liability to be put out does not relieve him of the responsibility to touch the base he is awarded and all intervening bases…
  14. I glossed over the fact that there is only an R3 in the OP. So my earlier post has an extraneous rule citation for this thread. Sorry, guys. For Mr. stkjock, Babe Ruth/Cal Ripken—age 12 and under play 6-inning regulation games--13 and above play 7-inning games. That can be found on page 19 of the 2015 rule book (in the Local League and Tournament Play Special Rules and Regulations).
  15. From the 2015 Cal Ripken rule book: 4.09(b) When the winning run is scored in the last half-inning of a regulation game, or in the last half of an extra inning, as the result of a base on balls, hit batter or any other play with the bases full which forces the batter and all other runners to advance without liability of being put out, the umpire shall not declare the game ended until the runner forced to advance from third has touched home base and the batter-runner has touched first base. An exception will be if fans rush onto the field and physically prevent the runner from touching home plate or the batter from touching first base. In such cases, the umpires shall award the runner the base because of the obstruction by the fans. PENALTY: If the runner on third refuses to advance to and touch home base in a reasonable time, the umpire shall disallow the run, call out the offending player and order the game resumed. If, with two out, the batter-runner refuses to advance to and touch first base, the umpire shall disallow the run, call out the offending player, and order the game resumed. If, before two are out, the batter-runner refuses to advance to and touch first base, the run shall count, but the offending player shall be called out.