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Jimurray

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Everything posted by Jimurray

  1. If that is a lineup Smith would be above Jones in one of the 9 slots. Jones would be in the 10 slot although some put the two together in the batting slot.
  2. I'm confused.
  3. And the answer as posted by @Richvee seems clear enough unless we are not getting something
  4. Yes, why is @johnnyg08 asking such a simple question? Unless it is not simple. What does he mean by plays in the game again. I would suspect that would not happen with competent umpires.
  5. The balk should be called when an ump recognizes it, which might entail a slight delay. Time should be called when the pickoff is caught by F3. If it was a wild pickoff time should be called when the ball is returned to the infield and the runner has stopped advancing which happened in your case when the runner was tagged. In either case, after time is called, the runner will be awarded 2B. If the umpire took awhile to process the balk and didnt verbalize it until the play was over it still will be a balk and it happens sometime. But there is no requirement to delay the balk call. Only the time call will be delayed depending on the sit.
  6. The history of this rule and it's interps seems to envision the batter hindering the catcher by impacting the ball. Any call regarding a DTK in MLB since and before the the wording change has been a batter impacting an uncaught third strike and being called out. But we would have to know what Barrett saw and what @Gil proposes as his caseplay solution. But, the ball bounces in front of the catcher and the batter runs in front of him as he should, but clearly hindering the catcher with contact. What's your call, on a DTK, on a bunt, or on ball four?
  7. No. Especially if not informed. But, as in FED, if you know the rule, and an illegal sub is attempted, that you should be aware of, younshould try to apply preventatative umpiring. @Rich Ives is assuming umpires and tournaments where all are aware of the LL rules. That is not always the case.
  8. I let one line go one time. Good third strike on the corner. Batter takes end of bat and draws a line that touches the side of the plate.
  9. Was Jim not listed as a sub in the line-up but was listed on the Affidavit? In that case add him to the line-up. The Tournament FAQs then say to correct the situation and move on. All actions by the improper (if he was improper) sub stand. You could have stopped the game to consult with region without a protest.
  10. Didn't "no" answer the question?
  11. No
  12. You can't watch for it if you are doing your job properly on the back end and a throw is imminent. If it blows up in front of you you get it, otherwise, turn and be set for the hardest call in 2 man.
  13. Good point. So we would have to know what the Ump Manager conversation was about as far as how he ruled. But still a topic for discussion. As it is that rule change differs from FED and NCAA giving leeway to a batter on a DTK. It's kind of strange that on a third strike where the batter can't run any unintentional movement of the ball keeps it live but if he can run it's probably INT in OBR. Meanwhile runners can advance if it's not a DTK (DTK equals UTK)
  14. I would not give up one of the hardest calls in 2 man, the back end of the DP, to get the FPSR violation. If it happens in front of you get it. Otherwise get turned and set for the play at 1B.
  15. Why am I getting a captcha puzzle sometimes and sometimes a captcha start but no puzzle when I go to U-E?
  16. I would agree. The umpire has to judge "clearly hinder". As to whether he hinders by moving the ball ( we've seen it called in MLB) or by tangle with the catcher ( so far I have not seen it called) is up for discussion.
  17. Prior to the rule change PBUC/MLBUM used to absolve the runner when hindrance took place unless it took place "up the line" where the batter had a chance to avoid "to avoid the ball". In the current rule and interp distance is no longer a factor so hindering the catcher by making the ball harder to field can be INT. My take is that tangle/untangle still applies at HP as far as physical contact goes. But if the batter had kicked the ball itself that would be INT no matter how close to HP it was.
  18. They had no between inning music? Wanted further away from peanut gallery comments?
  19. Feel free to call it if you deem intent rather than normal base running. Need examples of Holliday and or others previous attempts
  20. Just to be clear he was a retired runner. He would be penalized for unintentionally interfering with a thrown ball once he abandons normal base running.
  21. After you get them to read the rule you still might have a few who can't comprehend. Then you will have to print this from the PBUC/MLBUM, courtesy of @noumpere in another thread. Don't be disappointed however if one or two of your colleagues get halfway through and whine about why they made the rule so complicated and why can't the just give the coach a choice. Here's a complete (?) summary from PBUC: 7.9 CALLING "TIME" AFTER A BALK The penalty for balk allows the play to proceed without reference to the balk if the batter and all runners advance one base on the pitch following the balk (i.e., the actual pitch and/or action caused by the batter hitting the ball). The umpire shall not call "Time" until play stops following the balk. The question therefore arises as to when the umpire is to call "Time" to kill the ball after calling a balk. The following cases should help explain when play is considered "stopped" and a what moment the umpire should call "Time" following the call of balk: (1) If the pitcher balks and does not throw the ball, call "That's a balk; Time!" and enforce the balk. (2) If the balk is followed by a batted ball, leave the ball in play until it is apparent that the batter and all runners will not advance one base. At that moment, call "Time" and enforce the balk. If, however, the batter reaches first base and all runners advance at least one base on play following the balk, play proceeds without reference to the balk. EXAMPLES: (a) If a batted ball follows the balk and results in a fly ball that is caught, call "Time" the moment the fly ball is caught. Then enforce the balk. (b) If a batted ball follows the balk and results in a ground-out on a previous runner at the base to which he would be entitled because of the balk, call "Time" the moment the out is made. Then enforce the balk. (3) If the balk is followed by a pitch that is caught by the catcher, call "Time" the moment the catcher catches the ball. Then enforce the balk. (Note exception in ball four situations covered in item (5) below.) (4) If the balk is followed by a pick-off throw to a base that is caught by a fielder, call "Time" the moment the fielder catches the ball. Then enforce the balk. (5) If the balk is followed by ball four delivered to the batter and is caught by the catcher, call "Time" and enforce the balk unless all runners advance one base because of ball four. In that situation, play proceeds without reference to the balk. (6) If the balk is followed by a pitch that strikes the batter, call "Time" the moment the pitch strikes the batter. Then enforce the balk unless the hit batter forces all other runners to advance one base, in which case play proceeds without reference to the balk. (7) If the balk is followed by a wild throw to a base, the Approved Ruling of Official Baseball Rule 8.05 provides that the runner may advance beyond the base to which he is entitled at his own risk. In that situation the umpire shall call the balk in the usual manner but shall not call "Time" until all play has ceased (runners have stopped trying to advance and a fielder is in possession of the ball in the infield). (8) If the balk is followed by a wild pitch, the Approved Ruling of Official Baseball Rule 8.05 provides that the runner may advance beyond the base to which he is entitled at his own risk. In that situation, the umpire shall call the balk in the usual manner but shall not call "Time" until all play has ceased (runners have stopped trying to advance and an fielder is in possession of the ball in the infield). Note that even if the runner advances to or beyond the base to which he is entitled because of a wild pitch following a balk, the balk is still "acknowledged." That is, the pitch is nullified and the batter will resume the at-bat with the count that existed when the balk occurred unless: (a) The wild pitch was ball four on which all runners advanced one base; or (b) The wild pitch was strike three on which the batter and all other runners advanced one base. In both situations (a) and (b) above, play proceeds without reference to the balk, because all runners (including the batter-runner) advanced one base on the pitch following the balk.
  22. So a knowingly retired runner at 2B on a force should not slide into 2B? Not that the OP was knowingly retired.
  23. Normal baserunning.
  24. Normal base running. No INT
  25. Might be wrong link. He was running the bases normally as a runner or retired runner. No INT unless deemed intentional which it was not. Advancing retired runners can slide into 2B and 3B if the slide is legal.