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You've Got to Have Balls to Make it in This League. My Life as an Umpire.


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#1 Majordave

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 09:18 PM

Finished this one a week or so ago and had to think/stew on it before I wrote a review.

Great Title.

I really liked her stories. I understand that the world is not a fair place and many, many umpires do not want or believe a woman should be umpiring at any level except maybe women's softball. But I got a little tired, especially at the end, of the complaining and whining about what she endured and how unfair it was. It seems like she was honest and that she was a good umpire and didn't take much, if any, crap from anybody most of the time but then let some ridiculous things happen without taking action. One story said it all for me; a manager taking her and bending her back and kissing her at a plate meeting? WTH? No EJ, no nothing. She said something like; I was surprised and the crowd seemed to like it and I was so surprised that I didn't know what to do. I don't know about any of you other umpires but if anyone touches me without my permission other than a handshake...... BOOM! Ejection. But I guess you had to be there.

She apparently worried about her ejection rate and reportedly led the league in EJ's every year she worked. If they push or cross the line, they get dumped! Especially with what some of these guys called her and how they acted. She goes on and on about tobacco juice and spit in her face. I just don't understand how and why they expect an umpire in the minors to accept and endure that kind of abuse. I don't ever let them get in my face like that, I won't stand and argue. Dump them at the first sign of them getting out of control. She apparently made a lot of mistakes and admits them so maybe she endured more as a result of her belief she might have deserved the treatment she got. I know I will and probably a lot of you will endure a bit more if we think we missed it or might have.

I can't help but believe a lot of her shortcomings resulted from never having played baseball before becoming an umpire. She did play fast pitch softball but we all know the big diamond creates a completely different set of challenges and when combined with the speed and ability of the average professional athlete...... pretty tough to handle that. I do think she was at least a competent to pretty good umpire in most areas or she wouldn't have stayed around all those years. The bottom line, the thing I am constantly reminded of from reading all these umpire books and talking with professional umpires and NCAA D1/tourney umpires--It is how you handle the odd situations and manage the personalities that makes a great umpire. She admittedly did not handle everything as well as she could and should have but I also see that she suffered abnormal and unusual amounts of abuse and challenging situations.

I still respect her for trying for so long and for writing about it.

Her book offers a very different perspective and well worth the time it took to read. It was a quick but sometimes tedious read.

My two cents.........

#2 LMSANS

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Posted 03 April 2011 - 08:10 AM

Finished this one a week or so ago and had to think/stew on it before I wrote a review.

Great Title.

I really liked her stories. I understand that the world is not a fair place and many, many umpires do not want or believe a woman should be umpiring at any level except maybe women's softball. But I got a little tired, especially at the end, of the complaining and whining about what she endured and how unfair it was. It seems like she was honest and that she was a good umpire and didn't take much, if any, crap from anybody most of the time but then let some ridiculous things happen without taking action. One story said it all for me; a manager taking her and bending her back and kissing her at a plate meeting? WTH? No EJ, no nothing. She said something like; I was surprised and the crowd seemed to like it and I was so surprised that I didn't know what to do. I don't know about any of you other umpires but if anyone touches me without my permission other than a handshake...... BOOM! Ejection. But I guess you had to be there.

She apparently worried about her ejection rate and reportedly led the league in EJ's every year she worked. If they push or cross the line, they get dumped! Especially with what some of these guys called her and how they acted. She goes on and on about tobacco juice and spit in her face. I just don't understand how and why they expect an umpire in the minors to accept and endure that kind of abuse. I don't ever let them get in my face like that, I won't stand and argue. Dump them at the first sign of them getting out of control. She apparently made a lot of mistakes and admits them so maybe she endured more as a result of her belief she might have deserved the treatment she got. I know I will and probably a lot of you will endure a bit more if we think we missed it or might have.

I can't help but believe a lot of her shortcomings resulted from never having played baseball before becoming an umpire. She did play fast pitch softball but we all know the big diamond creates a completely different set of challenges and when combined with the speed and ability of the average professional athlete...... pretty tough to handle that. I do think she was at least a competent to pretty good umpire in most areas or she wouldn't have stayed around all those years. The bottom line, the thing I am constantly reminded of from reading all these umpire books and talking with professional umpires and NCAA D1/tourney umpires--It is how you handle the odd situations and manage the personalities that makes a great umpire. She admittedly did not handle everything as well as she could and should have but I also see that she suffered abnormal and unusual amounts of abuse and challenging situations.

I still respect her for trying for so long and for writing about it.

Her book offers a very different perspective and well worth the time it took to read. It was a quick but sometimes tedious read.

My two cents.........



I read this a few months back and was very unimpressed. She didn't really want to umpire, she initially started because it was a paying job. Then because she was a woman, she was pushed along.

Not great literature, a tale of the 80s where women were getting more respect & jobs, just not always for the right reasons. They never said she was a good umpire, They just kept promoting her.

Larry
Shore Umpires; NJ

ECIUA





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