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2012 NCAA Test


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#1 johnnyg08

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 04:08 PM

Well, at 12:01 am tomorrow morning, the 2012 NCAA test window opens.

I am wondering what strategies you use to get you through the test?

Do you take it all at one time?

Do you break it up into smaller sections?

Or do you do something completely different?

Share your test-taking strategies here!
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#2 Matt

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 12:04 AM

And...I'm done!

Just kidding. I probably won't even start until next weekend.

#3 ump81

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 07:16 AM

Guys, I break it up, go very slow and check every question with the rule book, I never answer off the TOP of my head, and like every standard test go with your first best answer and move on, almost every time I over-think and go back and change it, it is wrong! 10 video questions this year should be interesting, its 60 questions instead of 50, allows a few extra wrong and still passing. I have not registered yet but payday is tomorrow and I will sign up and get it started asap. No matter how thorough I usually get about a 90-94, think 92 last year. Always a few ones I just guess wrong! Good luck.

#4 johnnyg08

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 07:35 AM

I have seen the video questions, which I love, and they are not all cut and dry...which is the point of the test. Very excited.
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#5 johnnyg08

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 08:13 PM

I just cut and pasted my 50 test questions on separate paper.

I think I'm going to work through them on paper first, then transfer my answers to the test on Arbiter.
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#6 zm1283

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 11:39 AM

I am in the process of working through the test. I have had a few that are throwing me for a loop. I will go one at a time.

Here's the first:

R1, two outs. The starting pitcher has just been relieved by S1. The relief pitcher promptly throws the first three pitches well out of the strike zone. and then unsuccessfully attempts to pick off R1. His coach signals that he wants a second relief pitcher. S2 attempts to pick off R1 and throws the ball past F3. At that time, the PU wakes up and realizes that S1 had not completed pitching to the first batter he had faced.

a. Don't do anything and hope no one else notices the mistake.

b. Have a conference with your partner(s).

c. Let the play stand and then eject both S1 and S2

d. Let the wild pick-off play stand. Bring back S1 to finish his batter while S2 remains an eligible substitute.


Okay, so we know that S1 didn't pitch to one batter, the coach made a trip, and S2 is now in the game pitching to S1's first batter. The NCAA book says under 9-4-c(3) in the A.R. that if the umpire fails to recognize that the coach is making a second trip during the same batter, the coach is not penalized.

So he's not penalized, so S1 and S2 aren't going to be ejected, that eliminates C as a choice. I suppose you could have a conference with your partners to straighten it out, so B is a possibility. I'm thinking D at this point, but the rule book doesn't specify what do to if this happens. (At least not the part I've found so far) Anyone?

#7 JaxRolo

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 11:59 AM

I am in the process of working through the test. I have had a few that are throwing me for a loop. I will go one at a time.

Here's the first:

R1, two outs. The starting pitcher has just been relieved by S1. The relief pitcher promptly throws the first three pitches well out of the strike zone. and then unsuccessfully attempts to pick off R1. His coach signals that he wants a second relief pitcher. S2 attempts to pick off R1 and throws the ball past F3. At that time, the PU wakes up and realizes that S1 had not completed pitching to the first batter he had faced.

a. Don't do anything and hope no one else notices the mistake.

b. Have a conference with your partner(s).

c. Let the play stand and then eject both S1 and S2

d. Let the wild pick-off play stand. Bring back S1 to finish his batter while S2 remains an eligible substitute.


Okay, so we know that S1 didn't pitch to one batter, the coach made a trip, and S2 is now in the game pitching to S1's first batter. The NCAA book says under 9-4-c(3) in the A.R. that if the umpire fails to recognize that the coach is making a second trip during the same batter, the coach is not penalized.

So he's not penalized, so S1 and S2 aren't going to be ejected, that eliminates C as a choice. I suppose you could have a conference with your partners to straighten it out, so B is a possibility. I'm thinking D at this point, but the rule book doesn't specify what do to if this happens. (At least not the part I've found so far) Anyone?


I like "A" :no: but have to go with "D" makes the most sense. The other answers do not make sense at all!

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#8 ump_24

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 12:15 PM

The key to taking a test isn't to look for what makes one answer right, but what makes the other three wrong.

Option A - stand there, do nothing, and hope no one notices. When is that ever a viable option in the umpire world?

Option B - conference. A conference for what? Finalizing post game dinner plans? Talking about the hot waitress at the place the crew hit up for lunch? Come on.

Option C - Let the play stand and they eject the two of them. Umpire error is the cause of this situation. Why would you even consider willingly ejecting someone when its your fault.

Process of elim: correct answer = D

Favourite part of the question: "At that time, the PU wakes up..." lol

#9 zm1283

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 12:21 PM

The key to taking a test isn't to look for what makes one answer right, but what makes the other three wrong.

Option A - stand there, do nothing, and hope no one notices. When is that ever a viable option in the umpire world?

Option B - conference. A conference for what? Finalizing post game dinner plans? Talking about the hot waitress at the place the crew hit up for lunch? Come on.

Option C - Let the play stand and they eject the two of them. Umpire error is the cause of this situation. Why would you even consider willingly ejecting someone when its your fault.

Process of elim: correct answer = D

Favourite part of the question: "At that time, the PU wakes up..." lol


Yeah, that's what I was about to go with. You could have a conference with your partners to make sure you handle it right if you've never had this situation come up before. Not saying everyone should, but I can see it happening.

#10 JaxRolo

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 12:25 PM

The key to taking a test isn't to look for what makes one answer right, but what makes the other three wrong.

Option A - stand there, do nothing, and hope no one notices. When is that ever a viable option in the umpire world?



Unfortunately I see it happen way to often.

There are times when I am watching a game and something happens and I wonder why the Umpire is not doing something.

I used to be a really good Baseball Player until my eyes started going bad. So I became an Umpire!

2014  Game Count:

           Regular Season HS: 38

           HS Scrimmages:       5

           Perfect Game:          0

           Other Games:          22

 

2013 Game Count: 283 :nod:

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#11 mstaylor

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 01:30 PM

I just cut and pasted my 50 test questions on separate paper.

I think I'm going to work through them on paper first, then transfer my answers to the test on Arbiter.

Be careful, the order will be different when you go back, I think. I guess if you just copied it and then saved it, then it will stay the same. If you didn't save it then it will be different.
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#12 yawetag

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 08:28 PM

There are times when I am watching a game and something happens and I wonder why the Umpire is not doing something.


Probably because they didn't see it or don't know what to do.
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#13 UmpTTS43

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 09:58 PM

I am in the process of working through the test. I have had a few that are throwing me for a loop. I will go one at a time.

Here's the first:

R1, two outs. The starting pitcher has just been relieved by S1. The relief pitcher promptly throws the first three pitches well out of the strike zone. and then unsuccessfully attempts to pick off R1. His coach signals that he wants a second relief pitcher. S2 attempts to pick off R1 and throws the ball past F3. At that time, the PU wakes up and realizes that S1 had not completed pitching to the first batter he had faced.

a. Don't do anything and hope no one else notices the mistake.

b. Have a conference with your partner(s).

c. Let the play stand and then eject both S1 and S2

d. Let the wild pick-off play stand. Bring back S1 to finish his batter while S2 remains an eligible substitute.


Okay, so we know that S1 didn't pitch to one batter, the coach made a trip, and S2 is now in the game pitching to S1's first batter. The NCAA book says under 9-4-c(3) in the A.R. that if the umpire fails to recognize that the coach is making a second trip during the same batter, the coach is not penalized.

So he's not penalized, so S1 and S2 aren't going to be ejected, that eliminates C as a choice. I suppose you could have a conference with your partners to straighten it out, so B is a possibility. I'm thinking D at this point, but the rule book doesn't specify what do to if this happens. (At least not the part I've found so far) Anyone?


There is no violation pertaining to visits in the question. We have a visit where coach removes his starter. Subsequant visit to sub is allowed as long as coach has a remaining conference left. The visit to the sub would be classified as the first visit even though the same batter is at bat. (same batter, different pitcher)

#14 Matt

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 02:18 AM

Option A - stand there, do nothing, and hope no one notices. When is that ever a viable option in the umpire world?


When I have chili earlier in the day, it is.

#15 zm1283

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 04:11 PM


I am in the process of working through the test. I have had a few that are throwing me for a loop. I will go one at a time.

Here's the first:

R1, two outs. The starting pitcher has just been relieved by S1. The relief pitcher promptly throws the first three pitches well out of the strike zone. and then unsuccessfully attempts to pick off R1. His coach signals that he wants a second relief pitcher. S2 attempts to pick off R1 and throws the ball past F3. At that time, the PU wakes up and realizes that S1 had not completed pitching to the first batter he had faced.

a. Don't do anything and hope no one else notices the mistake.

b. Have a conference with your partner(s).

c. Let the play stand and then eject both S1 and S2

d. Let the wild pick-off play stand. Bring back S1 to finish his batter while S2 remains an eligible substitute.


Okay, so we know that S1 didn't pitch to one batter, the coach made a trip, and S2 is now in the game pitching to S1's first batter. The NCAA book says under 9-4-c(3) in the A.R. that if the umpire fails to recognize that the coach is making a second trip during the same batter, the coach is not penalized.

So he's not penalized, so S1 and S2 aren't going to be ejected, that eliminates C as a choice. I suppose you could have a conference with your partners to straighten it out, so B is a possibility. I'm thinking D at this point, but the rule book doesn't specify what do to if this happens. (At least not the part I've found so far) Anyone?


There is no violation pertaining to visits in the question. We have a visit where coach removes his starter. Subsequant visit to sub is allowed as long as coach has a remaining conference left. The visit to the sub would be classified as the first visit even though the same batter is at bat. (same batter, different pitcher)


Maybe I typed it wrong. I didn't mean that the coach was actually charged with a visit. I just meant that he went to the mound.

The question here is what to do with a coach who is allowed to go to the mound before the batter has completed his at-bat.

#16 UmpTTS43

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 09:40 PM

zm

Coach is allowed to visit S1 while the same batter is at bat provided he has a conference remaining. He can't visit same pitcher twice during same batter. He can visit two different pitchers during same batter.

#17 johnnyg08

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 10:39 AM

Does Rule 6-3b apply here:

6-3b
The ball becomes dead and base runners return when:
Art. b.
The batter interferes with the catcher's attempt to throw out a runner who is attempting to steal second or third base.

The Question

R2, R3, no outs, 2-2 count. B1 swings and misses the next pitch. The catcher immediately attempts a pick off at third. His throw hits the batter in the batter's box and goes directly into the dugout. The batter did nothing intentionally.

a.The ball becomes dead, R3 is called out on the batter's interference, R2 is returned to second, and the batter is out on strike three.

b.Because the ball entered the dugout, both R2 and R3 score.

c.The batter is out because of the unintentional interference by R3.

d.The batter is out and the ball becomes dead. R2 and R3 are each awarded one base because the ball went into the dugout.

I'm thinking it is B, because we can't expect the batter to disappear and F2 is responsible for clearing the hitter.
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#18 johnnyg08

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 10:49 AM

I just cut and pasted my 50 test questions on separate paper. I think I'm going to work through them on paper first, then transfer my answers to the test on Arbiter.

Be careful, the order will be different when you go back, I think. I guess if you just copied it and then saved it, then it will stay the same. If you didn't save it then it will be different.


Great tip...thank you.
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#19 mstaylor

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 01:53 PM

Does Rule 6-3b apply here:

6-3b
The ball becomes dead and base runners return when:
Art. b.
The batter interferes with the catcher's attempt to throw out a runner who is attempting to steal second or third base.

The Question

R2, R3, no outs, 2-2 count. B1 swings and misses the next pitch. The catcher immediately attempts a pick off at third. His throw hits the batter in the batter's box and goes directly into the dugout. The batter did nothing intentionally.

a.The ball becomes dead, R3 is called out on the batter's interference, R2 is returned to second, and the batter is out on strike three.

b.Because the ball entered the dugout, both R2 and R3 score.

c.The batter is out because of the unintentional interference by R3.

d.The batter is out and the ball becomes dead. R2 and R3 are each awarded one base because the ball went into the dugout.

I'm thinking it is B, because we can't expect the batter to disappear and F2 is responsible for clearing the hitter.

B is correct.
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#20 zm1283

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 03:48 PM

zm

Coach is allowed to visit S1 while the same batter is at bat provided he has a conference remaining. He can't visit same pitcher twice during same batter. He can visit two different pitchers during same batter.


I'm confused now. He was allowed to remove S1, who had not pitched to a batter yet. I don't see what it has to do with conferences. Is D correct above?




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